Review: Van Gogh in 50 Works – John Cauman

 

Van Gogh in 50 Works

John Cauman

Harper Collins Publishers  Australia

Pavilion

ISBN: 9781911624431

 

Description:

From humble beginnings in Nuenen and Antwerp to his last month in Auvers-sur-Oise, this captivating book on Vincent Van Gogh’s life and works is the perfect introduction for all students and art lovers interested in late nineteenth-century and Post-Impressionist art.

 

Featuring fifty of his finest works, each painting and drawing is described and analyzed in beautiful detail, within the context of the period, so that the reader can really understand what the artist was hoping to achieve with each work. Drawing from the many letters that Van Gogh wrote to his brother, friends and others, curator John Cauman provides an enthralling and accessible narrative about the artist and his work, introducing the milieu, key characters, the themes, and legacy that continues to this day.

 

Among his most famous works, this book includes The Potato Eaters (1885), Père Tanguy (1887), Self-Portrait in front of Easel (1888), Still Life Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers (1888), Cafe Terrace at Night (1888), Bedroom in Arles (1888), Van Gogh’s Chair (1888), Portrait of Joseph Roulin (1889), Self-portrait with Bandaged Ear (1889), Irises (1889), The Starry Night (1889) and Wheat Field with Crows (1890).

 

My View:

This is a stunning collection, beautifully presented- the photography is first class- it looks like you have THE art in your hands…loved this very motivating read.

A must for all art lovers.

 

2 thoughts on “Review: Van Gogh in 50 Works – John Cauman

  1. I love Van Gogh’s work! I was very lucky to stay near the Van Gogh Museum once when I was in Amsterdam. 🙂 Thanks for sharing this, Carol – it sounds fantastic.

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