Ricotta and Orange Olive Oil Cake: Around the Table, delicious food for everyday – Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Around the Table

Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Plum

Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781760984915

Description:

Slow Sundays are for herbed roast chicken and silky smooth panna cotta. Eating outside means cheddar scones and fresh, spring salads. Friends coming by for afternoon coffee calls for a simple blackberry yoghurt loaf or comforting ginger cake with cream cheese frosting.

Beloved home cook Julia Busuttil Nishimura always knows the right dish for the occasion, weather or time of day. She also understands the power food has to bring people together, whether that’s to prepare a meal or enjoy the delicious results.

With recipes ranging from quick, flavourful meals for busy weeknights to simple indulgences for summer feasts, Around the Table perfectly matches dishes to time and place. It includes recipes laden with personal meaning – Mediterranean classics from Italy and Malta, and Japanese dishes Julia has learned from her husband, Nori – that will soon become favourites around your table, too. 

It is no secret that I love ricotta and extra-virgin olive oil. These two ingredients have featured heavily in my cooking since I was young. Here they marry in this very simple cake where the ricotta provides
fluffiness and the olive oil adds richness and a very moist crumb. This is one of those back-pocket recipes that can be whipped up at a moment’s notice, with no special equipment necessary
.” p79

Ricotta and Orange Olive Oil Cake

SERVES 8
250 g caster sugar
zest of 2 oranges
3 eggs
100 ml freshly squeezed orange juice
150 ml extra-virgin olive oil
250 g (1 cup) fresh full-fat ricotta
250 g (1 ⅔ cups) self-raising flour
pure icing sugar, for dusting (optional)


Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease and line a 23 cm round cake tin. Place the sugar and orange zest in a large bowl. Rub the orange zest into the sugar until it is damp and fragrant. Whisk in the eggs until combined. Add the orange juice and pour in the olive oil. Add the ricotta and whisk it all together, then gently mix in the flour until just combined.


Pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Allow the cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then remove from the tin and continue to cool on a wire rack. Once cool, dust with icing sugar if desired, then serve.


The cake will keep in an airtight container for 3–4 days.

Around the Table by Julia Busuttil Nishimura, published by Plum, RRP $44.99,

photography by Armelle Habib

Review- Marlo – Jay Carmichael

Marlo

Jay Carmichael

Scribe

ISBN: 9781925713695

RRP$24.99

Description:

A novel of two men, love, and aching loneliness.

It’s the 1950s in conservative Australia, and Christopher, a young gay man, moves to ‘the City’ to escape the repressive atmosphere of his tiny hometown. Once there, however, he finds that it is just as censorial and punitive, in its own way.

Then Christopher meets Morgan, an Aboriginal man, and the two fall in love — a love that breathes truth back into Christopher’s stifled life. But the society around them remains rigid and unchanging, and what begins as a refuge for both men inevitably buckles under the intensity of navigating a world that wants them to refuse what they are.

In reviving a time that is still so recent yet so vastly different from now, Jay Carmichael has drawn on archival material, snippets of newspaper articles, and photos to create the claustrophobic environment in which these two men lived and tried to love. Told with Carmichael’s ear for sparse, poetic beauty, Marlo takes us into the heartbreaking landscape of a relationship defined as much by what is said and shared as by what has to remain unsaid, and unlived.

My View:

I have mixed feelings about this book. I guess my biggest issue was inconsistency. Some of the writing is absolutely beautiful. But somewhere along the way it got a little lost, disjointed ( I got lost) the narrative was evocative, reads like a creative memoir – a “diary” of a time in the recent past that is largely missing from our (Australian) history books and for that point alone is worth reading.

Arelhekenhe Angkentye Women’s Talk

Arelhekenhe Angkentye – Women’s Talk, Second Edition

Poems of Lyapirtneme from Arrernte Women in Central Australia

Running Water Community Press

Distributed by NewSouth Books

ISBN:978-0-6480629-5-0

Lyapirtneme is an Arrernte word that means growing back, returning. It’s like if a bushfire went through the land, and all the trees burnt down, and the roots underground are still alive. When the rain comes you see little shoots growing out of the bottom of the tree, growing back again.’ – Therese Perrurle Ryder, Arrernte Elder. 

 “Lyapirtneme is an Arrernte word that means growing back, returning. It’s like if a bushfire went through the land, and all the trees burnt down, and the roots underground are still alive. When the rain comes you see little shoots growing out of the bottom of the tree, growing back again.” – Therese Perrurle Ryder, Arrernte Elder

Poems are written in both Arrernte and English. Includes an extensive Arrernte glossary

Features poems written by over twenty Arrernte women around the Arrernte concept of Lyapirtneme

In February and May 2019, a group of over twenty Aboriginal women from Central Australia wrote the poems in this book. The women are Central or Eastern Arrernte, or have strong connections to the Arrernte community. Some would describe themselves as writers but most would not. Most of the women are visual artists, and engaged in the daily work of maintaining the cultural life of Arrernte people and passing it on to the next generations.

These poems were developed in the yearly workshops organised as part of the NT Writers Festival. There is never an expectation that the poetry produced by these workshops will be published, however the resulting collection was so strong that production costs for a book were crowd funded in a matter of weeks.

There is healing in this poetry. 

These are our words. 

From our country. 

Our lands. Our spirits.

For all the troubles we face every day, we are a passionate people.

When we hear these poems, we know, we are lovers of life.

Aside from the very appealing cover this book of words and poems has some very evocative and emotional works that I am lucky enough to be able to share with you, thanks to Running Water Community Press, the authors and the publicists, DMCPR Media.

Sunflower

I’m planting a sunflower

in my garden

watering and watching

it grow

into a beautiful flower

Just like I am watching

my grandkids

grow up

like beautiful

pretty

butterflies

Carmelina Perrurle Marshal

Something I Felt

When I woke up in the morning

I walked outside.

Everything was wet –

drops on the trees

and the smell of the air was fresh.

It wa sncie and cool.

It was something I felt

in my heart – a relief.

A sadness had lifted.

My friend,

I thought about you.

Tisha Perrurle Carter