Paella – The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook – Dr Will Bulsiewicz

The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook

Dr Will Bulsiewicz

Vermillion

Penguin Random House

ISBN: 9781785044175

RRP $45

If you have been following along with my blog you will have realised how important I think gut health is for everyone. This book is another great resource on gut health, I hope you find it helpful.

“Saffron is a bulbous perennial plant in the iris family that blooms in the autumn. Harvest takes place over two weeks and the flowers are handpicked before dawn, before they open for the day. It requires more than six thousand flowers and over twelve hours of labour to create just 30 grams of saffron, hence the nickname “red gold.” In this recipe, the musky, piney saffron is complemented by the earthy, smoky paprika and garlicky sweetness. It’s a taste of heaven.” p261

9 Plant Points

Serves 4

1 tablespoon olive oil or vegetable stock

1 medium yellow or white onion, finely chopped

1 jarred roasted red pepper, chopped

1 red sweet pepper, seeded and chopped

1 medium courgette, chopped

2 garlic cloves, crushed

2 tomatoes, seeded and chopped

1 pinch saffron threads

1 teaspoon smoked paprika

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

220 g short-grain rice (Arborio, Japanese sushi rice, Bomba rice)

600 ml Biome Stock Unleashed (page 239) or vegetable stock

10 g fresh flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

1 lemon, sliced

1. In a paella pan or a large, shallow frying pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion, roasted red pepper, and sweet pepper to the pan and cook for about 10 minutes, until brown and reduced.

2. Add the courgette, garlic, tomato, saffron, paprika, and cayenne and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, for another 10 minutes, until the vegetables are soft.

3. Add the rice and stock and stir once to combine, then shake the pan to evenly distribute the rice and vegetables. Reduce the heat to medium-low and let simmer for 22 to 25 minutes. Check for most of the liquid to be absorbed and the rice at the top to be nearly tender. If for some reason your rice is still not cooked, add 60 ml more water or stock and continue cooking (can also finish cooking in the oven; see Pro Tip).

4. Remove the pan from the heat and cover with a tight-fitting lid or foil, then place a tea towel over the lid to rest for 5 minutes (this allows the rice to finish steaming). Garnish with fresh parsley and lemon slices.

PRO TIP:

Once the rice is mixed in, resist the urge to stir it again in order to allow a crispy crust to form at the bottom, called a socarrat. Depending on the size of your pan or burners on the hob, you may need to finish this in the oven. Cover with foil, then finish in a 175°C oven, until the rice is cooked through.

The Trinity Overnight Oats – The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook – Dr Will Bulsiewicz

The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook

Dr Will Bulsiewicz

Vermillion

Penguin Random House

ISBN: 9781785044175

RRP $45

If you have been following along with my blog you will have realised how important I think gut health is for everyone. This book is another great resource on gut health, I hope you find it helpful.

Chef Emeril Lagasse always spoke of the holy trinity of Cajun cuisine as celery, onions, and sweet peppers. Well, my holy trinity of spices is turmeric, ginger, and cinnamon. I have been loving this combo in my morning coffee for years, and now it’s part of this overnight oats recipe. You can’t go wrong with spices!

FODMAP note: As a banana ripens, the FODMAP content increases while the resistant starch content decreases. That said, we need the banana to be soft and get mashed in this recipe. A third of

a banana per serving is generally tolerated on a low FODMAP diet. A third of a date is FODMAP friendly.” p61

4+ Plant Points

Serves 1

120 ml unsweetened plain almond milk

1 teaspoon chia seeds

1/3 date, finely chopped

1/3 ripe banana, mashed

50 g jumbo oats

1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Pinch nutmeg

Pinch salt

Supercharge it! (optional toppings):

1 tablespoon golden raisins

1 teaspoon chopped Granny Smith apple

2 tablespoons roughly chopped walnuts

Dash ground cinnamon

1. In a jar or small bowl with a lid, add the almond milk, chia seeds, date, and banana.

Stir with a spoon to combine.

2. Add the oats, turmeric, ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt and stir to combine.

Cover with the lid and place in the fridge overnight, or until the oats have thickened

(about 6 hours).

3. In the morning, open the jar/bowl and top as desired with suggested toppings. If the oat

mixture is too thick, you can add a little more almond milk to your preference.

FF UNLEASHED:

If you are not following a low FODMAP approach, you can use 1 teaspoon maple syrup instead of the

date or 1 whole date per serving.

Mexican Hot Chocolate Brownies – The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook – Dr Will Bulsiewicz

The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook

Dr Will Bulsiewicz

Vermillion

Penguin Random House

ISBN: 9781785044175

RRP $45

If you have been following along with my blog you will have realised how important I think gut health is for everyone. This book is another great resource on gut health, I hope you find it helpful.

Brownies made from black beans . . . sign me up immediately! Mexican hot chocolate is known for its spices. In this recipe, you get cinnamon and cayenne pairing with the cocoa powder for a fiesta in your mouth!“p 294-295

4 Plant Points

Makes 12 brownies

One 400 g can black beans, drained and rinsed

125 g peanut butter

55 g almond or oat flour

25 g cocoa powder

120 ml 100% maple syrup

1 tablespoon avocado oil or other neutral oil

1 tablespoon white or apple cider vinegar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

120 g chocolate chips

1. Preheat the oven to 175℃. Lightly oil an 20 × 20 cm pan (or line with baking

parchment) and set aside.

2. In the base of a food processor, place the beans and pulse 5 or 6 times until well

chopped.

3. Add the peanut butter, flour, cocoa powder, maple syrup, avocado oil, vinegar,

vanilla, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda, cinnamon, cayenne, and salt. Process until

creamy and smooth, stopping to scrape down the sides as needed.

4. Remove the lid and stir in 80 g chocolate chips. Pour into the prepared baking dish (the

batter will be thick) and spread it out evenly. Top with the remaining 40 g chocolate chips.

5. Bake for 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

This is an extract from The Fibre Fuelled Cookbook by Dr Will Bulsiewicz. Published by Penguin Random House Australia, RRP $45. https://www.penguin.com.au/books/the-fibre-fuelled-cookbook-9781785044175

Ricotta and Orange Olive Oil Cake: Around the Table, delicious food for everyday – Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Around the Table

Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Plum

Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781760984915

Description:

Slow Sundays are for herbed roast chicken and silky smooth panna cotta. Eating outside means cheddar scones and fresh, spring salads. Friends coming by for afternoon coffee calls for a simple blackberry yoghurt loaf or comforting ginger cake with cream cheese frosting.

Beloved home cook Julia Busuttil Nishimura always knows the right dish for the occasion, weather or time of day. She also understands the power food has to bring people together, whether that’s to prepare a meal or enjoy the delicious results.

With recipes ranging from quick, flavourful meals for busy weeknights to simple indulgences for summer feasts, Around the Table perfectly matches dishes to time and place. It includes recipes laden with personal meaning – Mediterranean classics from Italy and Malta, and Japanese dishes Julia has learned from her husband, Nori – that will soon become favourites around your table, too. 

It is no secret that I love ricotta and extra-virgin olive oil. These two ingredients have featured heavily in my cooking since I was young. Here they marry in this very simple cake where the ricotta provides
fluffiness and the olive oil adds richness and a very moist crumb. This is one of those back-pocket recipes that can be whipped up at a moment’s notice, with no special equipment necessary
.” p79

Ricotta and Orange Olive Oil Cake

SERVES 8
250 g caster sugar
zest of 2 oranges
3 eggs
100 ml freshly squeezed orange juice
150 ml extra-virgin olive oil
250 g (1 cup) fresh full-fat ricotta
250 g (1 ⅔ cups) self-raising flour
pure icing sugar, for dusting (optional)


Method

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease and line a 23 cm round cake tin. Place the sugar and orange zest in a large bowl. Rub the orange zest into the sugar until it is damp and fragrant. Whisk in the eggs until combined. Add the orange juice and pour in the olive oil. Add the ricotta and whisk it all together, then gently mix in the flour until just combined.


Pour into the prepared tin and bake for 45 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Allow the cake to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then remove from the tin and continue to cool on a wire rack. Once cool, dust with icing sugar if desired, then serve.


The cake will keep in an airtight container for 3–4 days.

Around the Table by Julia Busuttil Nishimura, published by Plum, RRP $44.99,

photography by Armelle Habib

Pana cotta with Roasted Nectarines and Blueberries: Around the Table, delicious food for everyday – Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Around the Table

Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Plum

Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781760984915

Description:

Slow Sundays are for herbed roast chicken and silky smooth panna cotta. Eating outside means cheddar scones and fresh, spring salads. Friends coming by for afternoon coffee calls for a simple blackberry yoghurt loaf or comforting ginger cake with cream cheese frosting.

Beloved home cook Julia Busuttil Nishimura always knows the right dish for the occasion, weather or time of day. She also understands the power food has to bring people together, whether that’s to prepare a meal or enjoy the delicious results.

With recipes ranging from quick, flavourful meals for busy weeknights to simple indulgences for summer feasts, Around the Table perfectly matches dishes to time and place. It includes recipes laden with personal meaning – Mediterranean classics from Italy and Malta, and Japanese dishes Julia has learned from her husband, Nori – that will soon become favourites around your table, too. 

Panna Cotta With Roasted Nectarines and Blueberries p.102

SERVES 4
500 ml (2 cups) pure cream
1 vanilla pod, split and seeds scraped
3 strips of lemon peel
1 fresh bay leaf
80 g (⅓ cup) caster sugar
2 titanium-strength gelatine leaves
200 g crème fraîche
ice cubes
125 g blueberries
boiling water
ROASTED NECTARINES
5 nectarines, halved and stones removed, cut into wedges
2 tablespoons raw sugar

Around the Table by Julia Busuttil Nishimura, published by Plum, RRP $44.99, photography by Armelle Habib

Panna cotta translates to ‘cooked cream’ and it is one of my favourite Italian desserts. Luckily, it also happens to be one of the simplest. I love it just set – panna cotta should have a good wobble and sit on the plate droopily rather than incredibly still.Mine is lightly perfumed with bay and lemon and heavily scented with vanilla. Served with some lightly poached or roasted fruits – nectarines or apricots in summer, rhubarb in spring (try the roasted rhubarb on page 248) and citrus in winter – panna cotta is such an elegant dessert, and an absolute joy to make.” p102


Method

Place the cream in a saucepan with the vanilla seeds and pod, lemon peel and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook for 2 minutes or until slightly thickened – don’t let it boil. Add the sugar
and whisk to dissolve, cooking the cream for a further 1 minute.

Remove from the heat.


Meanwhile, soak the gelatine leaves in a bowl of cold water until softened. Squeeze the excess water from the gelatine and whisk it into the cream mixture. Whisk in the crème fraîche, then strain the mixture through a fine sieve into a bowl. Reserve the vanilla pod, bay leaf and lemon peel. Sit the bowl in a larger bowl filled with ice cubes and whisk the mixture for 8–10 minutes, until cool. Pour the mixture into a large jug and then divide among four small bowls or ramekins. Chill in the fridge for 5 hours or until just set.
Once the panna cotta has set, cover each bowl or ramekin with plastic or beeswax wrap and return to the fridge.

While the panna cotta is setting, prepare the roasted nectarines. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Place the nectarines in a deep baking tray so they are nice and snug and scatter over the sugar. Rinse the vanilla
pod, bay leaf and lemon peel that you used to flavour the cream. Add these to the nectarines along with 125 ml (½ cup) of water. Roast in the oven for 30 minutes or until the fruit is tender. Transfer the nectarines to a large bowl and add the blueberries. Stir to combine and allow to completely cool. You can store the fruit in a container in the fridge until ready to serve.


Dip each panna cotta bowl or ramekin into a bowl filled with boiling water for 20 seconds, then invert onto plates. Serve with the roasted nectarines and blueberries.

Japanese Curry Rice: Around the Table, delicious food for everyday – Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Around the Table

Julia Busuttil Nishimura

Plum

Pan Macmillan

ISBN: 9781760984915

Description:

Slow Sundays are for herbed roast chicken and silky smooth panna cotta. Eating outside means cheddar scones and fresh, spring salads. Friends coming by for afternoon coffee calls for a simple blackberry yoghurt loaf or comforting ginger cake with cream cheese frosting.

Beloved home cook Julia Busuttil Nishimura always knows the right dish for the occasion, weather or time of day. She also understands the power food has to bring people together, whether that’s to prepare a meal or enjoy the delicious results.

With recipes ranging from quick, flavourful meals for busy weeknights to simple indulgences for summer feasts, Around the Table perfectly matches dishes to time and place. It includes recipes laden with personal meaning – Mediterranean classics from Italy and Malta, and Japanese dishes Julia has learned from her husband, Nori – that will soon become favourites around your table, too. 

Japanese Curry Rice

Since curry was introduced to Japan, it has been transformed into its own unique dish and is now incredibly popular. Instead of starting with a curry paste, the meat and vegetables are simmered in water,
creating a rich broth as they cook, which is then thickened and flavoured with a roux-based curry brick. Curry bricks are essential to making Japanese curry and there are many variations available at supermarkets in Japan, as well as Japanese grocers here in Australia.

This recipe shows you how to make your own bricks. It really is rather simple and just requires an assortment of spices. After lots of experimenting with ratios, my recipe is just how we like it at home,
but feel free to vary the amounts to suit your own tastes. The quantity makes enough for four curries. I store the remainder in the fridge, where they keep for a month; alternatively, the bricks can be frozen.
When we are in Japan, we visit one of our favourite places for curry, Bird Co‚ee, in Osaka, at least once. They serve their curry in vintage brown bowls with plenty of rice and a boiled egg. It is really comforting and so simple to make from scratch. A typical accompaniment to Japanese curry are pickles, in particular
fukujinzuke and rakkyo. The former is a type of vegetable pickle, generally a mixture of daikon, eggplant, cucumber and lotus root, usually available from a Japanese grocer. Here, I’ve given a recipe for a pickled shallot, which is the next best thing to rakkyo (small young Japanese shallots, originally from China), which are almost impossible to find where I am. I love making them, and while they need a bit of time to pickle, they are really simple to put together. While the pickled shallot isn’t identical, it still provides a nice sweet, vinegary and salty contrast to the curry. The vegetables added to the curry are traditionally cut with a rolling technique: simply make a cut on the diagonal, turn the vegetable 45 degrees, then make another cut. Keep on rolling the vegetable as you cut – this ensures that the pieces are of even size . p220-221

SERVES 4

700 g skinless chicken thigh fillets, cut into 3 cm pieces
sea salt
2 tablespoons olive oil or vegetable oil
1 onion, roughly chopped
4 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
3 cm piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated
2 potatoes, peeled and roll cut (see recipe introduction) into 2 cm pieces
2 carrots, peeled and roll cut (see recipe introduction) into 2 cm pieces
1 apple, coarsely grated
2 tablespoons light soy sauce
1 tablespoon tomato sauce (ketchup)
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

To make the curry powder, toast the whole spices in a dry frying pan over medium heat for 1–2 minutes, until fragrant. Transfer to a spice grinder or a mortar and grind or pound to a powder. Transfer to a small bowl, add the remaining curry powder ingredients and stir to combine.


To make the roux, melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. When foaming, add the flour and curry powder and cook, stirring, for 2–3 minutes. Transfer the curry base to a sheet of baking paper and,
using the baking paper to help you, form the curry base into a square brick. Divide the brick into quarters, then place in an airtight container or wrap in baking paper or plastic wrap, and keep in the fridge until
ready to use.


To make the curry, season the chicken with salt and warm the oil in a large saucepan over medium–high heat. Brown the chicken for 2–3 minutes each side, then remove from the pan and set aside. Add
the onion and cook for 3–4 minutes, until it begins to soften, then add the garlic and ginger and cook for another minute until fragrant.

Add the potato and carrot and return the chicken to the pan. Stir so that everything is well coated, then add 600 ml of hot water. Increase the heat to high and bring to the boil. Once boiling, reduce the heat
to medium–low and simmer for 15–20 minutes, until the chicken and vegetables are cooked through. Add a curry brick and mix well – the brick will melt into the curry. Add the apple, soy sauce, tomato sauce
and Worcestershire sauce and simmer for 4–5 minutes, until the curry has thickened. Check for seasoning, then serve with steamed rice, jammy eggs and pickles.


NOTE: To make the pickled shallots, peel and trim 750 g small shallots, being careful not to trim too much of the root, as ideally the shallots should remain whole. You want 500 g shallots once they are peeled.
Rinse the shallots to remove any residual skin or grit, then dry them thoroughly with a clean tea towel. Place the shallots in an airtight jar with 50 g salt (10 per cent of the shallot weight). Cover with cooled boiled water, then screw on the lid, shake well and allow to sit at room temperature for 3 days, shaking the jar a few times a day. Alternatively, especially if you live in a very hot climate, they can be stored in the fridge with an increased soaking time of 1 week.

Drain the shallots and squeeze out any excess water. Clean the jar and allow it to air-dry, then return the shallots to the jar. Heat 250 ml (1 cup) rice vinegar and 80 g (⅓ cup) caster sugar in a small
saucepan over medium heat. Heat until the sugar has dissolved, then remove from the heat. Pour the amazu (sweetened pickling vinegar) over the shallots and allow to cool. Once cooled to room temperature, store in the fridge. They are ready to eat once they have cooled and will keep for many months submerged in the amazu.

CURRY POWDER
25 g (¼ cup) coriander seeds
3 tablespoons cumin seeds
3 teaspoons fenugreek seeds
2 tablespoons black mustard seeds
2 tablespoons ground turmeric
½ teaspoon chilli powder
1 teaspoon ground cloves
3 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper


ROUX
140 g unsalted butter
100 g (⅔ cup) plain flour


TO SERVE
steamed Japanese short-grain rice (such
as koshihikari)
jammy eggs, halved
rakkyo or pickled shallots (see Note)
fukujinzuke

Around the Table by Julia Busuttil Nishimura, published by Plum, RRP $44.99,

photography by Armelle Habib

Tiramisu – Intolerance Friendly Kitchen – Georgia McDermott

**Images courtesy of Georgia McDermott**

Tiramisu: because if cream, carbs, coffee and booze can’t lift your spirits, there’s probably not much that will. Tiramisu traditionally uses mascarpone and whipped eggs for the creamy layer and rum or Marsala for the alcohol. This version uses lactose-free whipping cream, gin or a FODMAP-friendly
spirit of your choice, and gluten-free savoiardi to keep the FODMAP content low.

Tiramisu

LOW LACTOSE
FODMAP FRIENDLY
GLUTEN FREE
Serves: 6–8
Prep time: 1 hour
Cook time: 30–40 minutes


FOR THE SAVOIARDI:
(makes 30–40 biscuits)
4 extra-large eggs, separated
110 g (½ cup) caster sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste
80 g (½ cup) fine white rice flour
60 g (½ cup) tapioca flour
50 g (½ cup) almond meal
40 g (¼ cup) icing sugar (to finish)


FOR THE COFFEE MIXTURE:
125 ml (½ cup) fresh espresso coffee
2–3 tablespoons gin or FODMAP-friendly spirit of choice
310 ml (1 ¼ cups) hot water


FOR THE CREAM MIXTURE:
500 g (2 tubs) full-cream, lactose-free whipping cream
80 g (½ cup) pure icing sugar


TO FINISH:
70% cocoa solids dark chocolate, to grate unsweetened cocoa powder, to dust

METHOD
Preheat oven to 180°C. Line 2 large baking trays with baking paper. I like to lightly oil the trays first so the paper doesn’t move when I pipe. Place flours in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Combine egg yolks, 55 g (¼ cup) caster sugar and the vanilla bean paste in a large bowl or stand mixer. Using
electric beaters, beat on high speed until light and fluffy, about 5–10 minutes.

Place egg whites in a separate clean, dry bowl. Using clean electric beaters, beat until the whites become frothy, then gradually add the remaining caster sugar. Beat until stiff peaks form. Gently fold half the egg yolk mixture into the egg white mixture. Repeat with remaining half until just combined. Gently fold
flour mixture into egg mixture until just combined.

Place your piping bag in a tall glass, and spoon mixture into the bag. I generally use a ziplock bag with a 2 cm hole cut in one corner. Twist the top to seal. Pipe mixture onto prepared trays to create roughly 10 cm × 3 cm biscuits. Sprinkle with icing sugar.

Bake savoiardi for 8 minutes, then swap the trays and bake for another 5 minutes. Turn the oven down to 150°C and bake for another 10 minutes or until the savoiardi are crisp or tops are golden. Set aside to cool completely on trays.

To make coffee mixture, combine all ingredients in a wide, shallow bowl. Set aside.

To make the cream mixture, combine cream and icing sugar in a large bowl and, using electric beaters, beat until light and fluffy.

Construct: Quickly soak one savoiardi at a time in the coffee liquor mixture. The crunchier the savoiardi, the longer you can leave them to soak. Arrange the soaked savoiardi in the base of a 1.6 litre capacity serving dish.

Once you have completely covered the base of the dish, top the savoiardi with half the cream mixture. It is more important to completely cover the top of the tiramisu (for aesthetics, anyway) so make sure you save enough for that.

Top the cream layer with a generous grating of dark chocolate (I like to use a microplane). I think this chocolate layer makes the difference between an okay tiramisu and an amazing one. Repeat with another layer of savoiardi (any leftover coffee mixture can be drizzled over the biscuits here) and then
carefully spread over the remaining cream mixture. Finish with a super generous grating of the dark chocolate and dust with cocoa powder. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve (see notes).


NOTES
This recipe for savoiardi should make close to 40 biscuits, which is the perfect quantity for a
1.6 litre/28 cm dish. I have found that savoiardi batter often varies in the amount of biscuits
it yields. I recommend keeping enough ingredients for another batch on hand, just in case. If
your batch comes out with significantly fewer, make another half or whole batch to avoid
getting caught out later. They keep well in an airtight container and are delicious dipped in
espresso. Tiramisu is best served the next day, when the flavours have had a chance to meld
and the cream has set nicely. Leftover tiramisu keeps, covered, in the fridge for 1–2 days, if you can restrain yourself for that long.

** My Note – For those who are time poor – I have found GF savoiardi biscuits in my local supermarket which I have used in this recipe. YUM

Vegan Breakfast Banana Bread – Intolerance Friendly Kitchen – Georgia McDermott

**Images courtesy of Georgia McDermott**

The year 2020 taught us a few things, and one of them was the importance of a good banana bread. This version is refined sugar free, dairy free and vegan, which all sounds pretty good to me. While the quantity of ripe banana in this bread is within FODMAP limits, it might not agree with some. If you don’t get along with ripe bananas, use just ripe or slightly under-ripe ones instead. I find it can be helpful
to roast these first to bring out their sweetness and flavour.
p

LACTOSE FREE
GUM FREE
EGG FREE
VEGAN
FODMAP FRIENDLY
GLUTEN FREE
DAIRY FREE
Serves: 8–10
Prep time: 25 minutes
Cook time: 40–55 minutes

Vegan Breakfast Banana Bread

200 g (1 ¼ cups) fine white rice flour
60 g (½ cup) tapioca flour
2 ¼ teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
200 g banana, ripe or just ripe

METHOD:
Preheat oven to 180°C. Grease a 21.5 cm x 11.5 cm (base measurement) loaf pan.

Place flours, baking powder and soda, cinnamon and nutmeg in a large bowl and whisk to combine.

Mash the banana in a medium bowl, keeping some larger chunks for texture. Mix in the dry ingredients.

Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients until just combined. Stir in any additions here if using (see notes). You can top the bread with some thinly sliced banana coins or
slices, but this is optional.

Pour the mixture into the pan, sitting it on a baking tray. Cook for 40 minutes, or until the top is golden and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. If necessary, cover with foil and continue to cook for a further 10–15 minutes, or until cooked through.

Set loaf aside to cool in pan for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. Slice and serve with vegan, FODMAP-friendly yoghurt if desired.


NOTES
This banana bread will keep in an airtight container for up to 3–4 days.
You can mix in several things here: chocolate, nuts or berries. Just make
sure any additions are vegan, low FODMAP and gluten free if they need

Laksa – Intolerance Friendly Kitchen – Georgia McDermott

**Images courtesy of Georgia McDermott**

Laksa is a spicy noodle soup that hails from South-East Asia. Traditionally, it uses prawn stock as a base, garlic and onion in the spice paste and wheat noodles to finish. This version is vegan, FODMAP friendly and gluten free courtesy of a few simple substitutions. p 253

LACTOSE FREE
GUM FREE
EGG-FREE OPTION
VEGAN OPTION
FODMAP FRIENDLY
GLUTEN FREE
Serves: 4
Prep time: 30 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes


FOR THE LAKSA PASTE:
5–6 fresh birds eye chillies, (depending on your taste for heat), seeds removed, chopped
3 sticks lemongrass, trimmed, finely grated
50 g (1 small–medium piece) galangal, peeled, finely grated
50 g (1 small–medium piece) ginger, peeled, finely grated
20 g (1 small piece) fresh turmeric, peeled, finely grated
2 teaspoons sweet paprika (optional, for colour)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

FOR THE BROTH:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
5–6 spring onions, green parts only, chopped
20–30 fresh curry leaves, stalks removed
60 ml (¼ cup) vegan fish sauce
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1 tablespoon tamarind paste
1 tablespoon gluten-free tamari or dark soy
1.5 litres (6 cups) water or vegan stock
400 ml can coconut milk
400 g gluten-free tofu puffs or cubed, pan-fried tofu

TO FINISH:
½ quantity (200 g) gluten-free Chinese egg noodles
100 g vermicelli noodles
1 bunch Vietnamese mint, leaves picked,
to serve
trimmed bean sprouts, to serve, 1 long red chilli, deseeded, sliced, to serve


Method

  1. To make the laksa paste, use a mortar and pestle or food processor to grind the chilli, lemongrass, galangal, ginger and turmeric until smooth. Add the paprika and oil and mix to combine.
  2. For the broth, heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Cook the spring onion greens and curry leaves, stirring, for 2 minutes or until fragrant and softened. Add the laksa paste and cook, stirring, for 2–3 minutes or until fragrant. Add a splash of water if it sticks at any point. Add the vegan fish sauce, sugar, tamarind paste and tamari and stir to combine. Stir in the water or stock and coconut milk. Add the tofu, then reduce heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes to allow flavours to infuse.
  3. Meanwhile, par-cook the Chinese egg noodles (1–2 minutes instead of 2– 3) following instructions on page 251. Pour boiling water over the vermicelli in a heatproof bowl and leave to soften for about 2–3 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  4. Taste and adjust broth according to your preferences. Add a little extra stock or water if necessary.
  5. To serve, divide noodles between serving bowls. Ladle over the hot broth
    and finish with the Vietnamese mint, bean sprouts and chilli.

** Notes

Leftover laksa can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 days. I do recommend taking the noodles out if you are using the psyllium noodles ( as they tend to disintegrate if left in the liquid for long periods.)

Traditional laksa often uses both hokkien and vermicelli noodles. I’ve used a half- batch of my Chinese egg noodles and half vermicelli to make it vegan. If you prefer you can use all vermicelli to make it vegan.

Canned coconut milk often contains gums and thickeners, so read the label before buying.

If you cant find galangal, use a little more ginger and lemongrass ( around 25 g of each) p252

Review: Intolerance Friendly Kitchen – Georgia McDermott

Intolerance Friendly Kitchen

Georgia McDermott

Lantern

Penguin

ISBN: 9781761043932

Description:

Dependable, delicious recipes that make great food accessible for a range of intolerances- gluten free, FODMAP friendly and more.

If you have a dietary intolerance and sometimes feel you’re missing out on foods you’d love to eat, this book is for you.

Intolerance-Friendly Kitchen is all about reliable recipes that are gluten free, low FODMAP and vegetarian, and cater wherever possible to diets without dairy, eggs, nuts, grains, starches or gums.

Georgia McDermott – also known as much-loved Melbourne food blogger @georgeats – is passionate about making life’s delicious moments accessible to everyone, and she’s done all the painstaking recipe testing so you don’t have to. Whether it’s knowing the best flour to use for a certain cake or pastry, or offering a substitution to cut the lactose but keep the flavour, Georgia has worked out how to get the best results every time. Her 100+ beautifully photographed recipes include-

Yeasted croissants
Chocolate babka
Any-flour-you-like brownie cookies
Sourdough cinnamon scrolls
Vegetarian or vegan sausage rolls
Starch-free sourdough
Gluten-free egg pasta
Tofu and ginger dumplings

From bread, cakes and other sweet bakes to pasta, noodles and savoury pastry, this is a collection of recipes so rewarding and easy to follow that meeting your dietary requirements feels like a bonus!

About the Author

Georgia McDermott is a food stylist, food photographer, recipe developer and blogger. Georgia writes, cooks and photographs gluten-free, FODMAP-friendly and pescetarian recipes on her blog and is the author of the bestselling cookbook FODMAP Friendly.

My View:

By far the best gluten free /FODMAP friendly cook book I have come across in a long time. If you have food intolerances but love baking this book is for you!

Posting some great recipes … soon. 🙂 Lets get baking.