#MondayMunchies: Stuffed Capsicums -Yummy Easy Quick Around the World -Matt Preston

Yummy Easy Quick Around the World Cover

Yummy Easy Quick Around The World by Matt Preston. Published by Plum (through Pan Macmillan)

p182 GREECE

MAKES: 4 LARGE OR 6 MEDIUM

PREP: 20 MINS

COOKING: 2 HOURS

Stuffing vegetables and rolling stuff in vine leaves. These two techniques take on an important cultural significance
in this particular corner of the world. I didn’t know this when my mum would serve up roasted capsicums that were slightly slumped by the twin assault of roasting and stuffing; I just thought it was a tasty dinner, and the balance of the salty, meaty filling was ‘ace’ with the crimson flesh, its sweetness intensified by the oven.

I fear that the joy of the stuffed capsicum – like that of the baked potato or leeks rolled in ham and baked in a cheese sauce – has been lost to this generation. So let’s bring it back! If it’s going to be a campaign, we need a better hashtag than #getstuffed. Your inspiration is required, so make the dish, photograph it and post it on Insta tagged @mattscravat with your idea of the perfect #hashtag for the campaign.” p. 182
Stuffed capsicum

125 ml (½ cup) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra for brushing and drizzling
1 white onion, finely chopped
2 celery stalks, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
400 g lean beef mince
2 medium zucchini, coarsely grated
4 thyme sprigs, leaves stripped
3 teaspoons dried Greek oregano leaves
1 teaspoon dried mint leaves
½ whole nutmeg, finely grated
1½ teaspoons ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons sea salt
lots of freshly ground black pepper
100 g (½ cup) long-grain white rice
1 × 400 g can crushed tomatoes
150 ml chicken or beef stock, plus extra if €needed
1 cup coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
25 large mint leaves, thinly sliced
75 g pine nuts, lightly toasted
4 large or 6 medium red capsicums (look for straight sides with stalks if possible)

Preheat the oven to 220°C/200°C fan-forced. Heat 60 ml (¼ cup) of the oil in a large frying pan over medium–low heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring, for 3 minutes, then add the celery and cook, stirring, for 2€minutes or until just soft. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for a further 2 minutes or€until aromatic. Spoon the mixture into a bowl and set aside.

Increase the heat to high. Heat half the remaining oil in the same pan. Add half the beef and cook, breaking up the meat with a wooden spoon, for 5 minutes or until nicely browned. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat with the remaining oil and beef. Return all the beef to the pan and stir in the zucchini, thyme, dried oregano and mint, nutmeg, cinnamon, salt and pepper. Cook for 1 minute or until well combined.

Stir in the onion mixture, then add the rice, tomatoes and stock and bring to the boil. Immediately reduce the heat to low and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, for 15€minutes or until the rice has absorbed the liquid and the mixture looks moist but not saucy. You can always add a little more stock if needed. The rice will still have a little
resistance to the bite, but don’t worry as it will continue to soften in the oven. Stir the parsley, mint and pine nuts into the mince mixture. Season again if needed and€remove from the heat.

While the filling is cooking, prepare the capsicums. Use a sharp knife to slice around the top of each capsicum to create a lid. Try to do this neatly as this top will go back on. Carefully hollow out the middle, removing the seeds and membrane with a spoon. Brush the capsicums all over with oil, including the lids. Use a tablespoon to fill the capsicums with the hot mince mixture, but don’t overload them as the filling will expand during baking. Top with the capsicum lids.

Dig out a high-sided ceramic or cast-iron baking dish that will snugly fit the capsicums in€a standing position. Transfer the capsicums to the dish and drizzle with a little extra oil. Cover the dish with baking paper and then with foil (the baking paper stops the capsicums from sticking to the foil) and tightly seal. Bake for 1 hour, then uncover and bake for a further 30 minutes. The capsicums will be soft and nicely browned.

Remove from the oven and leave to cool down a bit. Serve just as they are or with the Greek salad.

 

MORRONES A LA PARRILLA CON HUEVO Y QUESO – Barbecued Capsicum with Egg and Pecorino – Ross Dobson & Rachel Tolosa Paz

the-food-of-argentina-9781925418712

From The Food of Argentina: Asado, empanadas, dulce de leche and more by Ross Dobson and Rachel Tolosa Paz. Photography © Rachel Tolosa Paz | Food styling © Vanessa Austin (Smith Street Books, November 2018 – AU$ 49.99, NZ$ 59.99)

 

 

 

MORRONES A LA PARRILLA CON HUEVO Y QUESO

Barbecued capsicum with egg and pecorino

 SERVES 4

 

BBQ Capsicum

4 medium red capsicums (bell peppers)

8 eggs

90 g (3 oz/1 cup) finely grated pecorino

1 tablespoon coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

 

Cut each capsicum in half lengthways, remove the stalks, seeds and white membrane and discard.

 

Preheat a barbecue hotplate or grill plate to high.

 

Place the capsicum on the barbecue and cook, turning frequently, for 10–15 minutes – you want the capsicum to be soft, but not too charred.

 

Turn the capsicum so they are cut side up, crack an egg into each half, then close the lid of the barbecue and cook for 8–10 minutes, until the eggs have set.

 

To serve, sprinkle over the cheese and parsley, and drizzle over the olive oil.

 

Authors note:

This is a novel and colourful way to cook eggs and capsicums (bell peppers). The capsicums should be soft and tender, so give them some time alone on the barbecue before cracking in the eggs.

For a slight variation on this recipe, lay a thin slice of provolone over each egg instead of using pecorino.

Meat Free Monday: Roasted Capsicum and Haloumi Shakshuka: Fodmap Friendly – Georgia McDermott

FODMAP Friendly Cover

FODMAP Friendly by Georgia McDermott, Published by Macmillan Australia, RRP $34.99

“Given that the volume of onion and garlic in a standard café shakshuka could put me in bed for a week, I’ve
given up ordering baked eggs when I’m out in favour of making them at home. Although they’re a little labour
intensive, roasted capsicums are a great substitute for the sweetness of caramelised onion, and anything that
includes haloumi warrants a bit of extra elbow grease, as far as I’m concerned.” p.35

Roasted Capsicum and Haloumi Shakshuka

shakshuka

Serves 4
4 medium–large red capsicums
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 kg tomatoes, chopped
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon mixed spice
1 teaspoon garam masala
2 teaspoons light brown sugar
1 teaspoon harissa paste or chilli sauce (make sure it doesn’t contain onion or garlic)
1 teaspoon tomato paste
¼ piece preserved lemon rind
125 g haloumi, diced
1 small handful each of fresh mint and coriander leaves, or your preferred herb
juice of ½ lemon
4 eggs

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C and line a baking tray with
baking paper.
2. Slice the capsicums in half, remove the seeds and lay them face down on the baking tray. Cook for at least 30 minutes, or until the flesh is soft and the skin has blistered and blackened. Once cooked, transfer them to a large bowl and cover with a cloth, to encourage them to sweat their skins off (aka what happens to me whenever the temperature reaches 26 degrees or higher).
3. Add the olive oil and tomatoes to a cast-iron frying pan over a medium heat (or you can use four small pans if you have them). Adding water as you see fit, cook the tomatoes down until they have the consistency of pasta sauce. Add the spices, sugar, harissa, tomato paste and preserved lemon, and gently stir to combine. Finally, add the haloumi cubes, herbs and the lemon juice, and stir gently to disperse throughout the mixture.
4. Using the back of a spoon, create a little indent for each egg, and gently crack each one into its designated spot. Turn the heat down to low, and cook extremely gently for a few minutes, alternating between placing a lid on and taking it off. Once the whites are cooked and the yolks still slightly runny, remove the pan from the heat and top with herbs and additional seasoning.
5. Allow to sit for a couple of minutes, so your guests don’t burn their hands on the pan, or their mouths on the shakshuka.

 

The Best Monday Night Meal in a Long Time

Do you know that feeling when you can’t really be bothered to cook? When takeaways don’t appeal (or are not readily available) and you just want something really quick, simple and yet full of flavour? Try Thai Chicken Stir Fry with Cashews and Chilli Jam Sauce from My Asian Kitchen by Jennifer Joyce.

This one is a winner! You can prep the sauce and veggies whilst you defrost the chicken in the microwave ( if, like me, you have only just decided what you want to cook for dinner 15 minutes before dinner time). The recipe states preparation time 10 minutes – correct. Cooking time 10 minutes – correct. Flavour – incredible!

 

Sneak Peek: Delicious Every Day – Anna Gare

delicious-every-day

Delicious Every Day

Anna Gare

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781742663906

I received this inspiring book in the mail yesterday. The synopsis states :

Learn to cook delicious food every day with Anna Gare’s delicious new cookbook that is mostly healthy, always tasty.

One of Australia’s most popular television cooks, Anna Gare, knows a thing or two about balancing a busy life with the need to serve up delicious, healthy food for the whole family, every day. In Delicious Every Day, she shares her absolute favourite go-to recipes: food to feed a crowd and to keep you and the rest of the family ticking over. There are solutions to midweek dinner dramas, such as Japanese salmon with miso broccoli and brown rice, one-pot stars such as herby chicken casserole on pearl barley, and ideas for salads and easy sides that are so good they’ll steal the show. Then you decide whether to be naughty or nice when it comes to dessert: Mexican spiced chocolate torte vs banana chia and almond cake with honeyed labne? Including a chapter on full-flavour no-fuss ideas for party food, Delicious Every Day contains the family recipes you’ll come back to again and again.”

I agree- this is a keeper – a book to add to the kitchen library with many recipes that I will use again and again. (And a hint – this is the perfect house warming present for those new to cooking for themselves- the recipes are easy, scrumptious and there are ideas suitable for all occasions – salads to share, breakfasts, onepot meals, party tricks…).

Tonight I made (with the ingredients I had on hand) Chicken Provencale p.124  Seconds were required, it was so good – and the leftovers have already been allocated for husband’s lunch tomorrow !

Chicken Provencale

My Twist On Shakshuka – A Breakfast Treat!

Back to the abundance of tomatoes and capsicum (bell peppers)  – my daughter was recently in Sydney on holidays had Shahshuka for breakfast in a restaurant  and recommended I give this a try- after a little research I found several recipes on the net that sounded useful.  I had most of the ingredients – tomatoes, garlic, capsicum, cumin, but not  the Pilpelchuma (the best I can describe it as – a type of hot sauce?) but I did have Kasundi (click here for the recipe I used.) So after about 20 minutes of cooking I was ready to drop my eggs into the pan to cook in the tomato/capsicum mixture. YUM. It is recommended that you serve with Labneh  (Greek style yoghurt works too).

 

IMG_2775

Shakshuka with a twist – breakfast delight

 

Day Five Green Juice Challenge

Today I juiced an ingredient  I haven’t tried juicing before- capsicum (bell pepper).

Recipe 

1 or 2 crisp Granny Smith apples

1/2 green Capsicum

2 stems Silver Beet

Juice all ingredients – drink immediately. This one is not bad 🙂

I think when juicing you need a variety of recipes and ingredients – for taste, nutrition  and to prevent boredom. Organic is best is you can source. Home grown fresh picked – YUM!

Do you have a recipe you want to share?