#MeatFreeMonday – Cauliflower Steaks with Red Hummus: More – Matt Preston

More

Matt Preston Published by Plum

RRP 39.99

Photography by Mark Roper

“I don’t really understand the attraction of fake meat that bleeds. Who is it going to attract? For me, part of the attraction of plant-based dishes is precisely that they don’t bleed. It’s probably something to do with carnivore guilt. Still, for that section of society here’s a steak that comes swimming in something sort of red that doesn’t involve a laboratory Petri dish. ” p75

Cauliflower Steaks with Red Hummus

 

2 teaspoons cumin seeds
juice of 1 lemon
60 ml (¼ cup) olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
35 g (¹⁄3 cup) currants
finely grated zest of ½ lemon
2 small heads cauliflower
¹⁄3 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves

RED HUMMUS (AKA MUHAMMARA)

150 g roasted red capsicum (from a jar is fine)
60 g (½ cup) walnuts, toasted
400 g can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1 tablespoon tahini
1 tablespoon harissa
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 small ice cubes
2 tablespoons olive oil
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Preheat a barbecue at plate with a lid on medium–high.
Combine the cumin seeds, tablespoons of the lemon juice and tablespoons of the olive oil in a bowl. Season well.

While your barbecue heats up, combine the currants, lemon zest, remaining lemon juice and remaining oil in a bowl. Season with salt and set aside so the currants plump up a bit.

Cut each cauliflower into 1. cm thick steaks, leaving the base intact, you will get about three steaks from each cauliflower. Save any leftover cauliflower for making rice to go with the Sri Lankan beetroot and cashew curry on page 236.

Brush the cauliflower steaks with the cumin mixture and place on the barbecue at plate. Close the lid and cook for 5 minutes or until golden and nicely charred. Turn over and cook for another 5 minutes or until the cauliflower is tender and golden.

Meanwhile, make the red hummus. Blitz the capsicum and walnuts in a food processor until almost smooth. Remove half and place in a bowl. Add the chickpeas, garlic, tahini, harissa, cumin, lemon juice and ice cubes to the processor and blitz until almost smooth.

With the motor running, add the oil in a thin, steady stream until smooth and well combined. Season with salt and pepper.

Add the parsley to the currants and toss together well. Spread the hummus over serving plates. Top with the reserved capsicum and walnut puree followed by the cauliflower steaks. Sprinkle with the currant mixture and serve.

 

**MEATY ADDITION: Reduce the cauliflower to 1 and serve with Barbecued white fish fillets see page 275 or 4 Barbecued or chargrilled chicken breast fillets see page 260.

#Meatless Monday: Cauliflower Soup – Dinner in 5 – Pete Evans

**If you swap out the chicken bone broth in this recipe with vegetable stock you have the perfect autumn vegetarian soup.**

Dinner in 5

Pete Evans

Plum

Pan Macmillan Australia

ISBN: 9781760559168

RRP$39.99

 

 

Cauliflower Soup 

SERVES 4

cauliflower 1 head (about 1 kg), broken into florets

onion 1, chopped

garlic cloves 4,

chopped chicken bone broth 1.25 litres (page 231) **or vegetable stock**

+ coconut oil or good-quality animal fat 3 tablespoons, melted

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling

“When cauliflower is abundant and cheap, I love to eat it in as many ways as possible. I roast, fry, pickle and use it raw in salads. One of the easiest and most satisfying ways to prepare cauliflower when you have a glut is to make a delicious soup. This one is really versatile, so use whatever seasonings take your fancy.” p 194

Preheat the oven to 200°C (180°C fan-forced).

Place one-quarter of the cauliflower florets on a baking tray, drizzle over 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil or fat and toss to coat. Sprinkle on a little salt and roast for 20 minutes, or until the cauliflower is golden. Set aside.

Heat the remaining coconut oil or fat in a large saucepan over medium–high heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes, or until slightly softened.

Stir in the garlic and cook for 1 minute, or until fragrant. Add the remaining cauliflower florets and cook for 5 minutes to soften.

Next, pour in the broth (**or stock**) and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat to medium– low and simmer for 30 minutes, or until the cauliflower is very tender.

Puree the soup with a hand-held blender until super smooth. Season with salt and pepper.

Ladle the soup into warm serving bowls and top with the reserved roasted cauliflower. Finish with a drizzle of olive oil, sprinkle on some pepper, if desired, and serve.

 

 

 

#MeatFreeMonday – Cauliflower Cheese Pastries – Family Food & Feelings – Kate Berry

Family Food and Feelings

Kate Berry

Pan Macmillan

Plum

ISBN: 978176078-180-4

RRP 39.99

 

Cauliflower Cheese Pastries 

 

‘Family, Food and Feelings by Kate Berry, Published by Plum, RRP $39.99, Photography by Kate Berry’ 

 

“Cauliflower cheese is a staple of the country pub bain marie, which is probably why I love it so much. Nothing makes me happier than counter meals in far-flung places, but I also like putting my own spin on them at home. So instead of serving this as a side for a huge chunk of roast meat, I wrap it in flaky pastry and make little hand pies.” 

Makes 12
1 head of cauliflower, cut into florets
1 onion, sliced
4 thyme sprigs
4 garlic cloves, unpeeled
3 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper
3 sheets ready-made puff pastry, thawed
1 free-range egg, beaten
50 g (½ cup) grated parmesan
2 thyme sprigs, leaves picked

For the cheese sauce:
60 g butter
3 heaped tablespoons plain flour
750 ml (3 cups) milk, heated
large handful of grated mature cheddar
½ teaspoon dijon mustard
½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
(optional) salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 225°C (fan-forced).

Pop the cauliflower florets, onion, thyme, garlic and olive oil on a large baking tray, season with salt and pepper
and gently toss to combine. Roast, tossing occasionally, for 35–40€minutes or until almost tender. Remove and set aside but leave the oven on.

While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauce. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over low heat, then whisk in the flour to create a smooth paste. Slowly pour in the milk while whisking constantly, then cook for 5–10 minutes or until the sauce is thick and smooth. You want it to be slightly thicker than a normal bechamel.

Take the sauce of the heat, then add the cheese, mustard and cayenne pepper (if using), and season to taste. Stir until the cheese has melted and the sauce is smooth. Add the roasted cauliflower and gently stir through. Set aside.

Place the pastry sheets on a clean bench and cut each sheet into four squares (so you have 12 all up).

Line two baking trays with baking paper. Place a pastry square on one of the prepared trays and pop a heaped tablespoon of the cauliflower mixture in the middle. Bring the four corners together into the centre and pinch together.

Repeat with the remaining pastry squares and cauliflower cheese.

Brush the pastries with beaten egg and sprinkle with the parmesan. Pop them in the oven for 15–20 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with thyme, then serve with your fave relish or sauce.

#Meat FreeMonday: Cauliflower Cakes – The Dirty Dishes – Isaac Carew

‘The Dirty Dishes: 100 Fast and Delicious Recipes by Isaac Carew, Published by Bluebird, RRP $39.99’ 

 

Cauliflower cakes
This is a twist on a potato rosti I used to make when I was a Saturday boy for my dad in the restaurant. One of my jobs was grating about a million potatoes to make crispy potato rostis. The amount of time and finesse it took to get the rostis perfectly crisp and brown on either side . . . I have never concentrated on something so much in my life! Having said that, these are really simple to cook. Just watch out for the water content in the cauliflower mixture before you start frying because you don’t want it to be too soggy.” p. 180

serves 2

sea salt
1 x 500g head of cauliflower, cored
and cut into florets
olive oil, for frying
1 onion, diced
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 tsp smoked paprika
40g strong flour
50g vegan hard cheese, grated
15g chives, chopped
pinch of smoked sea salt (optional)

To serve
green salad
dollop of dirty chilli sauce

Bring a pan of salted water to the boil over a medium heat. Add the cauliflower and boil for 3 minutes.
Drain, then set aside to stand for 5 minutes.

Meanwhile, hit a saucepan with a small amount of olive oil and sweat the onion for 2 minutes. Add the
garlic and smoked paprika and sweat for another 3 minutes.

Add the cauliflower to the onion and stir in the flour. Cook for 1 minute.

Either transfer the mixture to a food processor and pulse for 10 seconds, or chop the mixture until
fine on a chopping board. Allow the mixture to cool, then add the vegan hard cheese, chives and a
pinch of smoked sea salt, if using.

Form the cauliflower into 6–8 cakes. Either fry them in a splash of oil for 3 minutes on each side and
serve straightaway, or make the cakes in advance and allow them to firm up in the fridge for an hour
before frying.

Serve with a simple salad and the dirty sauce

.
TIP Boiling the cauliflower partly cooks it, takes some of the bitterness away and makes it easier to
form into cakes.

Harissa-roasted cauliflower with fig & yoghurt sauce: Roast – Louise Franc

Roast by Louise Franc_cover_

 

Edited extract from Roast by Louise Franc, published by Smith Street Books, $39.99. Available now

 

Harissa-roasted cauliflower with fig & yoghurt sauce

Serves 4

Harissa Roasted Cauliflower

185 g (6½ oz/¾ cup) plain yoghurt

1 whole cauliflower

25 g (1 oz/¼ cup) flaked almonds

1 tablespoon chopped parsley

 HARISSA

4 long red chillies

½ teaspoon caraway seeds

½ teaspoon coriander seeds

¾ teaspoon cumin seeds

½ teaspoon smoked paprika

3 garlic cloves

½ teaspoon rock salt

½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 roasted red capsicum, from a jar

juice of ½ lemon

 

FIG & YOGHURT SAUCE

125 g (4½ oz/½ cup) plain yoghurt

1 teaspoon tahini

zest of 1 lemon

1 small garlic clove, crushed

2 dried figs, finely chopped

 

Preheat the oven to 160°C/320°F (fan-forced). Line a deep-sided baking dish with foil.

 

To make the harissa, cut two of the chillies in half lengthways and remove the seeds and membranes. Roughly chop all four chillies and set aside.

 

In a small frying pan, toast the caraway, coriander and cumin seeds over medium heat for a minute or two, until fragrant. Tip the toasted seeds into the small bowl of a blender. Add the remaining harissa ingredients, including the chopped chillies, and blend until all the ingredients are chopped and you have a thickish paste.

 

Mix half the harissa through the 185 g (6½ oz/¾ cup) yoghurt, then taste to check if it is spicy or hot enough for you. Add more harissa to your taste, until the heat is to your liking.

 

Remove the core and any outer leaves from the cauliflower. Brush the harissa yoghurt mixture all over the cauliflower, ensuring it is evenly coated on all sides.

 

Transfer the coated cauliflower to the baking dish and into the oven. Roast for 30 minutes.

Add 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) water to the dish, cover with a lid or foil, and roast the cauliflower for a further 20 minutes, or until tender.

 

Meanwhile, in a small bowl, mix together the fig and yoghurt sauce ingredients until well combined.

 

Serve the cauliflower warm, with the fig and yoghurt sauce, sprinkled with the almonds and parsley.

 

 

Post Script: Roast; The New Classics – Louise Franc

Roast by Louise Franc_cover_

Roast

The New Classics

Louise Franc

Simon & Schuster Australia

Smith Street Books

ISBN: 9781925418460

 

Description:

A collection of classic and more innovative roasting recipes–from a simple roast turkey to roasted peaches with creme fraiche. Get more from your oven–and update your roasting techniques–with this classic and contemporary collection of delicious roasting recipes.

 

Chapters cover meat, poultry, vegetables, fish & seafood, sides, and desserts, and contain more than seventy classic and more contemporary recipes including beef cheeks in red wine, classic roast turkey with spicy cranberry sauce, beef pot roast, roasted lamb shanks with cannellini beans, mustard-glazed roast leg of ham, sticky roast pork ribs, roasted ducks with cherries, whole-roasted harissa cauliflower, and slow-roasted peaches with lime mascarpone.

 

My View:

Who said roasts are just for winter? This contemporary cook book has all the classics plus so much more. I can have a different roast meal every day of the week! Brilliant!

 

This is a gorgeously styled and presented book – I love that each recipe is accompanied by a full size image of the completed dish. This is such an important detail when you are cooking with new to you ingredients or when you haven’t tasted or tried the particular dish before – it’s so good to know how it should at least look when cooked.

 

There are so many great recipes here, something for everyone. My favourites are the one pot and the slow cooked meals; they give me more time to read.  Once these types of meals are prepped and in the oven I can let the dishes cook away whilst I take the opportunity to do more important things.

 

Recipes that instantly appealed to me? I can’t wait to try the roasted cauliflower recipe. I keep seeing this dish on trendy restaurant menus. Friends are raving about this dish.  And for something entirely new to me – roasted white chocolate dip with grissini, I will let you know how that turns out.

 

What is your favourite roast?