Post Script: The Other Girl – Erica Spindler

This is just my type of read!The Other GirlThe Other Girl

Erica Spindler

St Martin’s Press

ISBN: 9781250083654

 

Description:

From the NYT bestselling author comes a chilling new thriller about a ritualistic murder of a college professor that sends a small town cop back into the trauma she thought she’d put behind her.

Officer Miranda Rader of the Hammond PD in Louisiana is known for her honesty, integrity, and steady hand in a crisis—but that wasn’t always so. Miranda comes from Jasper, just south of Hammond, a place about the size of a good spit on a hot day, and her side of the tracks was the wrong one. She’s worked hard to leave the girl she used to be behind and earn respect in her position as an officer.

However, when Miranda and her partner are called to investigate the murder of one of the town’s most beloved college professors, they’re unprepared for the gruesomeness of the scene. This murder is unlike any they’ve ever investigated, and just when Miranda thinks she’s seen the worst of it, she finds a piece of evidence that chills her to the core: a faded newspaper clipping about a terrible night from her long-buried past. Then another man turns up dead, this one a retired cop, and not just any cop—Clint Wheeler, the cop who took her statement that night. Two murders, two very different men, two killings that on the surface had nothing in common—except Miranda. 14 years ago.

And when her fingerprints turn up at the scene of the first murder, Miranda once again finds herself under the microscope, her honesty and integrity doubted, her motivations questioned. Alone again, the trust of her colleagues shattered, Miranda must try to trust the instincts she’s pushed down for so long, and decide what’s right—before it’s too late.

 

My View:

 This is just my type of read! This novel has:

  • A great opening hook – where the reader just knows no good is going to happen and wants to shout at the protagonists to beware, but they don’t listen, ever.
  • Likeable protagonists that are flawed and credible.
  • A shocking crime or two to be solved.
  • Moral conflicts.
  • Compelling writing and storyline that kept me reading until I turned the last page.
  • And importantly, the author has managed to create a crime fiction narrative that has depth with many social issues being raised in the telling.
  • A new for me author who already has a catalogue of books I can seek out and read at my leisure. This is an author I have added to my musts read list.

 

 

 

 

Post Script: The Girl Who Wasn’t There – Ferdinand von Schirach

A unique voice in crime fiction.

The Girl Who Wasnt There

The Girl Who Wasn’t There

Ferdinand von Schirach

Translated by Anthea Bell

Little, Brown

Hachette

ISBN: 9781408705827

 

Description:

A smart, chilling tale of truth, deception and the reach of the law, The Girl Who Wasn’t There is the latest crime thriller from the acclaimed author of The Collini Case, a Waterstones Book Club pick.

 

Sebastian von Eschburg, scion of a wealthy, self-destructive family, survived his disastrous childhood to become a celebrated if controversial artist. He casts a provocative shadow over the Berlin scene; his disturbing photographs and installations show that truth and reality are two distinct things.

 

When Sebastian is accused of murdering a young woman and the police investigation takes a sinister turn, seasoned lawyer Konrad Biegler agrees to represent him – and hopes to help himself in the process. But Biegler soon learns that nothing about the case, or the suspect, is what it appears. The new thriller from the acclaimed author of The Collini Case, The Girl Who Wasn’t There is dark, ingenious and irresistibly gripping.

 

 

My View:

A unique voice in crime fiction.

 

Stylistically this read is a pared back, almost observational account of the life of Sebastian von Escburgh as related by a distant third party who has limited knowledge of the coming events and Sebastian’s thoughts. Sebastian seems to have little connection to the world at large and has difficulty expressing himself and seems almost locked in a solitary existence full of colour that only he can see. Like Sebastian’s life, the narrative is devoid of excess words and emotion; stark, honest, intelligent, disturbing and enlightened, its voice is strangely compelling, its questions universal. I do not think I have read anything quite like this before.

 

At the core of this work of misdirection and redirection are the questions of guilt, justice, actions and reactions – do the ends justify the means? Is torture ever justified? Who decides innocence or guilt? Who is responsible? We look at trial by media.

 

The psychological probing in this read will prick your conscience. Von Schirach is a brilliant storyteller.