Seeds, Seeds and Nuts

Real Delicious Cover

More baking – brought to you by Chrissy Freer’s Real Delicious; Seed and Parmesan Crackers p.110 ( my first and not my last attempt at making crackers – these are divine!)  and Seed and Nut Bars  p.111

These both taste fab ! And so easy to make I wonder why I haven’t tried these before.  The crackers are vegetarian (if you use Parmesan made with non animal rennet), the Seed and Nut bars are like an exotic, healthy, peanut free, brittle –  I used rice malt syrup instead of honey (a personal preference as I am allergic to honey) and used a mix of raw unsalted nuts, sunflower, sesame, pumpkin (pepitas) and chia seeds, macadamia oil ( my favourite oil to cook with)  and a few spices…so easy!

 

Seed and Parmesan Crackers and Seed & Nut Bars

 

Crackers – Real Food Projects – Kate Walsh

Real Food Projects

Recipe and images from Real Food Projects by Kate Walsh [Murdoch Books] photographer Cath Muscat.

 

Crackers

“Walk into any deli and you’re almost guaranteed to be gobsmacked by the cost of good crackers. But don’t settle for the cheap cardboard-tasting ones from the supermarket – try these instead; they’re dead easy to make, the ingredients cost very little, and they taste so amazing you’ll never be tempted to buy crackers again.

 

This is a basic recipe, so feel free to play around with the toppings – smoked salt, different chillies, seeds, dried herbs and spices. Roasting the spices in a small frying pan will really intensify their taste, so please don’t skip this step. You can also try incorporating some different flours like spelt and wholemeal (whole-wheat), for extra character and flavour. The crackers will keep well in an airtight container, so make a double batch and you’ll always have some on hand.

 Crackers

MAKES: 8 crackers

 

INGREDIENTS

 

1 tablespoon fennel seeds

1 tablespoon poppy seeds

1 tablespoon coriander seeds

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour

2 tablespoons olive oil, plus extra for brushing

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) water, plus 3 teaspoons extra

1 tablespoon sea salt

 

EQUIPMENT

 

small frying pan

large mixing bowl

wooden spoon

rolling pin or large bottle

2 baking trays, lined with baking paper

fork

wire cooling rack

 

Prepare your oven: Preheat the oven to 200ºC (400ºF).

 

Dry-fry your spices: In a small frying pan, gently toast the spices over low heat until they are fragrant; this should take about 30 seconds. There
is no need to use any oil. This step is important as it brings out the beautiful flavours of the spices.

 

Mix your ingredients: In a large bowl, mix the flour, oil and 60 ml
(2 fl oz/¼ cup) water, using a wooden spoon, until just combined. The mixture should be a little sticky and shaggy; you may need to add a little extra water, say about 3 teaspoons, depending on the flour and humidity.

 

Knead the dough: Tip the dough
out onto a floured work bench, then
knead for about a minute, or until the dough comes together; it should have the texture of a soft playdough. The best thing about this dough is that you can’t overwork it. Mixing it only a little will give you a flaky cracker; work it a lot and the crackers will be more uniform in texture.

 

Roll out: Shape the dough into a log about 30 cm (12 inches long) and cut into eight pieces. Using your rolling pin, roll each piece into an oblong shape that looks like a crocodile’s snout. They should be as thin as a piece of paper. If they are too thick, they will be doughy, not crispy. They will also stretch a little more when you transfer them to the baking tray.

 

Add the toppings: Sprinkle each piece of dough evenly with the salt and the toasted spices. Gently roll the rolling pin over the top to make sure the spices are incorporated, and don’t fall off when they are cooked.

 

Bake: Transfer to baking trays lined with baking paper. Brush with a little olive oil, then prick all over with a fork, to stop air bubbles forming. Bake for 6–8 minutes, or until they are golden.

 

Cool and store: Leave to cool on a wire rack. When cooled, transfer to an airtight container and keep in the pantry. The crackers are best consumed within 2 weeks.

 

HOW TO USE

 

  • Sprinkle with cheese before baking – perfect for little people’s lunchboxes.
  • For a richer cracker, add a handful of grated cheddar cheese to the dough mixture, and use melted butter instead of olive oil.” (pps.132-135)

 

Post Script: Real Food Projects – Kate Walsh

I think this cookbook was written just for me!

Real Food Projects

Real Food Projects

30 Skills. 46 Recipes

Kate Walsh

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781743364215

Description:

From churning your own butter and baking no-knead bread to making your own sausages for the barbecue, here are all the skills you need to break up with your supermarket and eat real food!

 

Real Food Projects is your handbook to 30 essential cooking skills that will connect you with your food again. Even if you’re a kitchen rookie, you’ll soon be churning your own butter and slathering it on your own no-knead bread, barbecuing your own homemade sausages or using the season’s freshest fruits to make your own cordials.

 

Step-by-step instructions and photographs guide you from start to finish. For too long we’ve been sold the idea that making our own food is difficult, time-consuming and not worth the effort. But self-taught cook and sustainable food advocate Kate Walsh knows that learning how to cook a few kitchen staples from scratch, using fresh local and seasonal produce, is the best way to improve your health and that of our food system. Better yet, it tastes delicious!

 

Get involved and get stuck into some real food projects today.

 

 

My View:

I think this cookbook was written just for me! There are so many projects listed here that I am already experimenting with in my own kitchen and more I want to try.

 

This is another winner in the real food movement, a book I am proud to have in my kitchen library.

I think the big tick items of this book are as follows:

√ Step by step instructions and photographs are included for all 30 projects.

√ Promotes start from scratch and waste less cooking.

√Promotes the use of fresh local seasonal ingredients.

√ Granolas, butter, cheeses, no knead bread, fruity cordials, sausages, kombucha, kefir, passata, jam, chutneys, yoghurt, nut butter…the list goes on.

√ Helps you rediscover the pleasure of cooking, eating and sharing homemade food.

√ Promotes “number free” cooking – the best way to ensure you know what goes into your food is to make that food yourself.

√ The projects in this book are designed for the home cook and the home kitchen so if you have a wooden spoon and a few bowls, you will be well on your way to making most recipes in this book.