The First of the Summer Veggies Have Been Picked

I love the summer garden – stone fruit, tomatoes, capsicum, coriander (cilantro), cucumber… and the obligatory tonne of zucchini – to eat, freeze, giveaway and pickle.

 

garden 24/11/017

 

Recently I have come across the most useful book: Cornersmith  Salads and Pickles – Alex Elliott-Howery and Sabine Spindler.

CrnrSmthSaladsPickles

This book is amazing, just what I need. I am not a naturally inspired salad maker – but I want to make inviting salads  and vegetable dishes that say eat me. It has recipes for yummy meals and guides for pickling and fermenting (good for the gut) which are great ways to store and use up our abundant seasonal fresh produce.

The Cornersmith way of eating sounds like a perfect match for me (and you): “The Cornersmith way to eat is about bringing together a variety of deliciously simple elements. Make one or two vegetable dishes, open a jar of pickles or ferments, add a good loaf of bread and perhaps an easy protein – a great piece of cheese, some eggs, a slice of grilled meat or fish. No diets, no superfoods, no guilt… Just good food with more taste and the added benefit of cutting down food waste. From the award-winning Cornersmith cafes and Picklery comes the follow-up to their bestselling self-titled cookbook, with a focus on seasonal salads, pickles and preserving. Including dozens of simple ideas for fresh ingredients that might otherwise be thrown away, Cornersmith: Salads & Pickles is your handbook to putting vegetables at the centre of the way you  eat.” 

 

https://www.murdochbooks.com.au/browse/books/cooking-food-drink/general-cookery-recipes/Cornersmith-Salads-and-Pickles-Alex-Elliott-Howery-and-Sabine-Spindler-9781743369234

 

 

 

Post Script: Ferment Pickle Dry – Simon Poffley and Gaba Smolinska-Poffley

 

ferment-pickle-dryFerment Pickle Dry

Ancient Methods, Modern Meals

Simon Poffley, illustrated by Kim Lightbody and Gabriela Smolinska-Poffley

Murdoch Books Australia

Frances Lincoln

ISBN: 9780711237780

 

Description:

Ferment, Pickle, Dry: Ancient Methods, Modern Meals offers a simple and exciting guide to fermenting, drying and pickling food, as well as the dishes you can make with your newly preserved ingredients.

Each recipe goes beyond the central preserved element to suggest a complete modern meal or snack. Recipes range from classics such as yoghurt, pickled gherkins and dried mushrooms, to clever creations such as carrot kimchi and garlic pickled in honey. Dishes cover simple meals (such as a sauerkraut rosti), to more elaborate recipes, including pickled orange and squid linguine.

 

The book covers the practical techniques and essential kit you need, and guides beginners as well as challenges seasoned preservers. It explores the art of ancient cooking methods, which has sparked the interest of hot chefs and trailblazing restaurants, as well as experimental foodies.

 

 

Author Bio:

Simon Poffley and Gaba Smolinska-Poffley of The Fermentarium are passionate about growing, preserving and cooking using traditional techniques. Simon teaches sourdough bread baking and is also the founder of the Left Bank Brewery. Gaba’s interest for foraging and preserving seasonal produce is rooted in her native Poland. The Fermentarium in London is the creation of like-minded people who want to share their enthusiasm for fermented and preserved foods.

 

 

My View:

This book is perfect for the home gardener/ preserver – sound like anyone you know? We are loving this book!  From sourdough breads, kombucha, kimchi, fermented turnips (do you detect a theme here?), dried fruits, candied peel,  ginger beer, preserved lemons,  fruit leathers,  pickled cherry tomatoes (we must try this when we pick our summer harvest – great in a Greek salad)…there is so much more on offer in this hard covered book.

 

What I love is that this is a practical easy to use guide – and with each preserved, pickled, dried or fermented ingredient there are “partner” recipes showing you how to use these ingredients in your cooking- BRILLIANT!

 

Back to the kitchen – time to start experimenting with some new  and different flavours, methods and ingredients.

 

 

 

 

Post Script: The Natural Cook – Matt Stone

The Natural Cook

The Natural Cook

Matt Stone

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781743365908

 Description:

A new kind of food revolution – kind to the planet, good for your body and for your soul.

How do you cook irresistible food without harming the planet?

 

It’s all about adopting new habits – opening your eyes to local foods and making the best of them, reducing waste by using every last bit of each ingredient, and enjoying well-raised meat and fish (while saving the bones to make the best broth ever!).

 

Try your hand at traditional techniques that have become popular again – yoghurt-making, preserving, pickling and fermenting. The bonus is that you’ll be producing delicious food that just happens to be good for you, too.

 

Matt Stone, one of Australia’s brightest young chefs, is a passionate advocate of zero-waste cooking and ethical food, and an even bigger fan of a cracking meal. Whether it’s a nourishing breakfast, a quick weeknight meal or a feast for friends, Matt shows how creating sustainable food that’s full of flavour is easier than you think.

 

 

My View:

What a great cook book – this one connects with me on so many levels. Matt Stone and I (and probably many of you who are reading this post or flicking through this cook book) share similar aspirations when it comes to home cooking (Matt also weaves some of these principals into his work as a chef)

√ Veggie patch – we have bountiful home grown seasonal fruit and vegetables.

√ Using bone and vegetable broths to enrich and add potent flavour to meals and great for gut health. And Chicken bone broth is our grandson’s first food – a great way to introduce real food to his diet.

√Pickles, fermenting and preserving home grown foods – Kimchi and Fermented Chili paste next on our list to make.

√ Use of wholefoods when possible.

√Drying and making powders – next on the list of how to use up our produce.

√ Great ideas for simple desserts, drinks and make your own spice mixes (flavoursome and budget friendly).

 

However there is one thing we do not share – a love for edible insects!!   The argument for sustainability doesn’t tempt me to try these sort of recipes  J Whitebait, Ants and Myrtle, Crisp Crickets, Melaworms and Australian Seven Spice….No No No 🙂    Thankfully this makes up just a tiny section of the book. 🙂