#MeatFreeMonday – Butternut Pumpkin with Lemon Tahini and Miso Granola: Community (New Edition) – Hetty McKinnon

More pumpkin goodness fro you.

Community: New Edition

 Hetty McKinnon

Published by Plum

RRP $39.99,

Photography by Luisa Brimble

 

Sweet butternut pumpkin drizzled with earthy, lemon-scented tahini is a simple salad in itself. Here, I’ve taken this reliable dish to another level with the addition of savoury granola. Miso and chilli sauce bring the umami, and work in tandem with the maple syrup, resulting in a uniquely savoury granola with just a whisper of sweet. This recipe makes a lot of granola – perfect for gifting or keeping in the pantry for snacking and salad topping. It can be stored in an airtight container for several months. You can also vary the nuts and seeds: pumpkin seeds, walnuts, almonds, cashews would all work – just keep the ratios the same.“p205

 

Butternut Pumpkin with Lemon Tahini and Miso Granola

1 large butternut pumpkin (about 1.5 kg), peeled and cut into thick wedges
80–100 ml extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon ground coriander
handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves
sea salt and black pepper

LEMON TAHINI
90 g (1⁄3 cup) tahini
juice of ½ lemon
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
sea salt and black pepper

MISO GRANOLA (MAKES 3 ½ CUPS)
100 g (1 cup) rolled oats
½ cup shelled pistachios, roughly chopped
½ cup hazelnuts, roughly chopped
½ cup sunflower seeds
¼ cup sesame seeds
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons white miso paste
2 teaspoons chilli sauce, such as sriracha, sambal oelek, gochujang (or use dried chilli flakes)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon maple syrup (or brown sugar)

 

Preheat the oven to 220°C.  Place the pumpkin on a baking tray, drizzle with the olive oil and scatter over the paprika, coriander and a generous amount of salt and pepper.
Using your hands, massage the oil and spices into the pumpkin pieces until they are well coated. Spread them in a single layer on the tray, and bake for 30–40 minutes, or until the pumpkin is tender, flipping over halfway through. Insert a knife or skewer to test for doneness.

For the lemon tahini, whisk together the tahini, lemon juice, olive oil and garlic until well combined. Season with salt and pepper.
Whisk in about 125 ml (½ cup) of water, a tablespoon at a time. The sauce will become thick – simply keep adding water and whisking until the mixture is the consistency of thickened cream.

For the miso granola, reduce the oven to 180°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine. Spread the mixture onto the prepared tray and bake for 20 minutes, stirring once, until golden.
Allow to cool completely, then break the granola into smaller pieces using your hands.

To serve, place the pumpkin on a plate and drizzle with the lemon tahini. Top with 3–4 tablespoons of miso granola and finish with the parsley leaves.

Frozen Berry Breakfast Bowl – Gordon Ramsay’s Ultimate Fit Food

Ultimate Fit Food

Gordon Ramsay’s Ultimate Fit Food ($39.99), published by Hachette Australia.


Photographer Jamie Orlando Smith

 

 

FROZEN BERRY BREAKFAST BOWL

SERVES 4

The ladies in my life love a bowl of berries like this in the morning. I think it’s because it tastes a lot like ice cream! Acai berries are one of the latest superfoods to reach our shores from South America and, among the many wondrous claims made of them, they are said to boost energy levels. So, no more excuses for staying in bed . . .” p. 196

Frozen Berry Breakfast Bowl

6 tbsp acai juice or 4 tbsp acai powder
300g frozen berries, such as blueberries, raspberries, strawberries or mixed berries
4 bananas, peeled, broken into pieces and frozen for at least 2 hours
Water, coconut water or apple juice, if needed
1 fresh banana
4 small handfuls of granola
2 handfuls of fresh blueberries

  1. Put the acai juice or powder, frozen berries and frozen bananas into a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. If the mixture looks like it needs some help blending, add a small amount of liquid, a little at a time, to get it going. The mixture should blend to a soft-serve ice cream consistency rather than a smoothie consistency.
  2. Transfer to serving bowls and top with sliced fresh banana, granola and fresh blueberries. Serve immediately, before it starts to melt!

TO MAKE IT LEAN

Leave out the acai juice or powder and replace it with an extra 100g of frozen berries if you’re watching your weight.

PER SERVING

KCAL 332

FAT (g) 12.0

SATURATES (g) 4.0

CARBS (g) 43.0

SUGARS (g) 33.0

FIBRE (g) 10.0

PROTEIN (g) 7.0

SALT (g) 0.04

 

Post Script: Real Food Projects – Kate Walsh

I think this cookbook was written just for me!

Real Food Projects

Real Food Projects

30 Skills. 46 Recipes

Kate Walsh

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781743364215

Description:

From churning your own butter and baking no-knead bread to making your own sausages for the barbecue, here are all the skills you need to break up with your supermarket and eat real food!

 

Real Food Projects is your handbook to 30 essential cooking skills that will connect you with your food again. Even if you’re a kitchen rookie, you’ll soon be churning your own butter and slathering it on your own no-knead bread, barbecuing your own homemade sausages or using the season’s freshest fruits to make your own cordials.

 

Step-by-step instructions and photographs guide you from start to finish. For too long we’ve been sold the idea that making our own food is difficult, time-consuming and not worth the effort. But self-taught cook and sustainable food advocate Kate Walsh knows that learning how to cook a few kitchen staples from scratch, using fresh local and seasonal produce, is the best way to improve your health and that of our food system. Better yet, it tastes delicious!

 

Get involved and get stuck into some real food projects today.

 

 

My View:

I think this cookbook was written just for me! There are so many projects listed here that I am already experimenting with in my own kitchen and more I want to try.

 

This is another winner in the real food movement, a book I am proud to have in my kitchen library.

I think the big tick items of this book are as follows:

√ Step by step instructions and photographs are included for all 30 projects.

√ Promotes start from scratch and waste less cooking.

√Promotes the use of fresh local seasonal ingredients.

√ Granolas, butter, cheeses, no knead bread, fruity cordials, sausages, kombucha, kefir, passata, jam, chutneys, yoghurt, nut butter…the list goes on.

√ Helps you rediscover the pleasure of cooking, eating and sharing homemade food.

√ Promotes “number free” cooking – the best way to ensure you know what goes into your food is to make that food yourself.

√ The projects in this book are designed for the home cook and the home kitchen so if you have a wooden spoon and a few bowls, you will be well on your way to making most recipes in this book.