Dentice Al Forno Con Patate; The Italian Home Cook – Silvia Colloca

 ‘The Italian Home Cook by Silvia Colloca, published by Plum, RRP $44.99, photography by Rob Palmer.’

Description:
‘Italians are taught from a young age to cherish the ingredients we cook with, whether home grown or store bought. We have observed our nonnas caring for these ingredients with passion and knowledge, and turning them into meals we will never stop craving or recreating.’

Australia’s favourite Italian home cook, Silvia Colloca, shares the 100 recipes that will show you how to cook like a true Italian, using the most humble of ingredients: end-of-summer tomatoes, salty anchovies, vibrant greens, oozy burrata and many more.

These are the dishes made lovingly in homes around Italy every day, and they are often brought to life with only a handful of ingredients and the simplest equipment. Try silky handmade noodles, savoury pies filled with fresh ricotta and parmigiano, crispy fried seafood, or slow-cooked ossobuco over saffron risotto. The Italian Home Cook is your essential guide to shopping, cooking and eating like an Italian, and will help you bring a little slice of Italy into your own home.

Another great book from this wonderful cook! I love Silvia’s recipes. Whole Snapper with potatoes, cherry tomatoes, olives and capers is perfect for any family gathering.

The idea with this dish is to create a tasty bed for a whole fi sh to nestle on. As it all bakes, the juices, flavours and aromas combine to create the most delicious one-pan dinner. Watch out for those coveted potatoes . . . they are sensational, having absorbed all the pan juices like golden sponges” p200

Ingredients: Serves 4

125 g (3⁄4 cup) cherry tomatoes, cut in half
90 g (1⁄2 cup) pitted black olives
1–2 tablespoons capers, rinsed and drained
3–4 anchovy fi llets in olive oil, drained
125 ml (1⁄2 cup) dry white wine 100 ml extra-virgin olive oil
3 potatoes, boiled and cut into wedges
salt flakes
1 × 1 kg whole snapper, scaled and gutted, scored with two slashes on each side
roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves, to serve

Method:

Preheat your oven to 180°C.

Oil a large baking dish.

Place the cherry tomatoes, olives, capers, anchovies, wine and half the olive oil in the dish. Add the potato, season with salt and toss with the other ingredients. Bake for 10 minutes, then remove from the oven.
Place the snapper on the cherry tomato mixture and baste with the pan juices, drizzling them onto the slashes cut into the flesh. Season with a little more salt and return to the oven. Bake for a further 20–25 minutes or until the fish is just cooked through. To test if it’s ready, gently lift some flesh with a butter knife. If it lifts off easily and looks opaque, the fish is done.

Scatter some parsley over the top, drizzle on the remaining olive oil and serve.

Saltimbocca All Romana; The Italian Home Cook – Silvia Colloca

 ‘The Italian Home Cook by Silvia Colloca, published by Plum, RRP $44.99, photography by Rob Palmer.’

Description:
‘Italians are taught from a young age to cherish the ingredients we cook with, whether home grown or store bought. We have observed our nonnas caring for these ingredients with passion and knowledge, and turning them into meals we will never stop craving or recreating.’

Australia’s favourite Italian home cook, Silvia Colloca, shares the 100 recipes that will show you how to cook like a true Italian, using the most humble of ingredients: end-of-summer tomatoes, salty anchovies, vibrant greens, oozy burrata and many more.

These are the dishes made lovingly in homes around Italy every day, and they are often brought to life with only a handful of ingredients and the simplest equipment. Try silky handmade noodles, savoury pies filled with fresh ricotta and parmigiano, crispy fried seafood, or slow-cooked ossobuco over saffron risotto. The Italian Home Cook is your essential guide to shopping, cooking and eating like an Italian, and will help you bring a little slice of Italy into your own home.

Another great book from this wonderful cook! I love Silvia’s recipes and I am going to share one of my favourites with you:

P214 POULTRY & MEAT

Saltimbocca alla Romana (Roman-style veal with sage and prosciutto)
The name of this classic Roman dish pretty much explains how delicious it is. Saltimbocca literally means ‘jumps in the mouth’, and I can guarantee this is going to be your wish the second you are presented with succulent veal delicately wrapped in savoury, crisp prosciutto and sage, and drizzled with wine-infused pan juices. The fact that this takes only 20 minutes to make should be enough for you to immediately bookmark this page.” p214

Ingredients: Serves 4

4 × 200 g veal minute steaks
4 thin slices of prosciutto di Parma, cut in half
12 sage leaves, plus extra as desired
150 g (1 cup) plain flour
2 1⁄2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
25 g butter
1 garlic clove, bashed with the back of a knife
150 ml dry white wine
sourdough, lemon wedges and green leaves, to serve (optional)

Method
Beat the veal steaks with a mallet until thin, then cut each steak into three pieces. Press a slice of prosciutto onto each piece, then place a sage leaf on top. Fold the meat to half enclose the prosciutto and sage, trying to keep it nice and flat.

Place the flour in a shallow bowl. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Dip each steak in the flour, shake off the excess, then place on a platter.

Heat the olive oil and butter in a large heavy-based frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and as many extra sage leaves as you like, then add the veal, sage leaf–side down, and cook for 3–4 minutes or until the prosciutto is crisp. Turn and cook for 1–2 minutes or until the veal is almost cooked through.

Add the wine to the pan and deglaze, scraping up any bits caught on the base. Cook out the alcohol for 1–2 minutes. Transfer the saltimbocca to a platter, drizzle over the pan juices and serve straight away with your choice of sourdough, lemon wedges and fresh green leaves.


Post Script: Dolce: 80 Authentic Italian Sweet Treats, Cakes and Desserts – Laura Zavan

Decisions,decisions…

Dolce

Dolce:

80 Authentic Italian Sweet Treats, Cakes and Desserts

Laura Zavan

Murdoch Books

Allen and Unwin

ISBN: 9781743367391

RRP$49.99

 

 

Description:

80 easy and authentic Italian recipes for sweet treats, cakes and desserts. Tiramisu after dinner, panettone at Christmas, an icy lemon granita on a summer’s day. . . the delights of Italy’s many desserts, or dolci, are celebrated around the world; perhaps because, above all else, dolci are about family and simplicity. Laura’s uncomplicated approach to the traditional desserts of her childhood makes Italy’s finest tarts, puddings, cakes and sweets easy for everyone to share and enjoy.

 

Author bio:

Food writer Laura Zavan was born in Treviso, near Venice, and her earliest childhood food memories originate there. She has written several books including Little Italy and Venice Cult Recipes, both published by Murdoch Books. She has a food blog (http://www.laurazavan.com/le-blog-de- laura-zavan/), runs cooking classes and writes for a variety of magazines and newspapers

 

My View:

What a delicious way to inspire you back into the kitchen after the cooking hangover from all the festive cooking! I have a problem – which to try first? All the Panna Cotta recipes look divine and easy to make and they have a section in the cook book all to themselves (I never knew panna cotta came in some many varieties); coffee, licorice, chocolate, bitter almond…the list goes on. There are tarts and tartlets (note to self I must get some small square tart tins) the Mascarpone and Berry Tartlets ( these I must make – quite simple really once the tarts cases are baked blind- filled with mascarpone cream and berries – a prefect summer dessert), Lemon and Almond Crostata, Ricotta Tart with Dried Fruit… I don’t know if I can go on, I have a strong desire to start cooking right now! *takes a small break and comes back to book*

 

 

There is more! Pastries, cakes, biscotti (who doesn’t love a biscotti with their coffee?) Or some home-made semi – freddo, or ice-cream or granita? Ok I now I have narrowed down my choices: Coffee Panna Cotta, Biscotti, Choc Hazelnut Spread (Gianduja) and I must make Fruit and Nut Turnovers (Tortelli Dolci) purely because they use prune jam and at Christmas a made a few jars to give away and a couple to keep in my pantry. Look out kitchen, here I come!!!