Post Script: Ferment Pickle Dry – Simon Poffley and Gaba Smolinska-Poffley

 

ferment-pickle-dryFerment Pickle Dry

Ancient Methods, Modern Meals

Simon Poffley, illustrated by Kim Lightbody and Gabriela Smolinska-Poffley

Murdoch Books Australia

Frances Lincoln

ISBN: 9780711237780

 

Description:

Ferment, Pickle, Dry: Ancient Methods, Modern Meals offers a simple and exciting guide to fermenting, drying and pickling food, as well as the dishes you can make with your newly preserved ingredients.

Each recipe goes beyond the central preserved element to suggest a complete modern meal or snack. Recipes range from classics such as yoghurt, pickled gherkins and dried mushrooms, to clever creations such as carrot kimchi and garlic pickled in honey. Dishes cover simple meals (such as a sauerkraut rosti), to more elaborate recipes, including pickled orange and squid linguine.

 

The book covers the practical techniques and essential kit you need, and guides beginners as well as challenges seasoned preservers. It explores the art of ancient cooking methods, which has sparked the interest of hot chefs and trailblazing restaurants, as well as experimental foodies.

 

 

Author Bio:

Simon Poffley and Gaba Smolinska-Poffley of The Fermentarium are passionate about growing, preserving and cooking using traditional techniques. Simon teaches sourdough bread baking and is also the founder of the Left Bank Brewery. Gaba’s interest for foraging and preserving seasonal produce is rooted in her native Poland. The Fermentarium in London is the creation of like-minded people who want to share their enthusiasm for fermented and preserved foods.

 

 

My View:

This book is perfect for the home gardener/ preserver – sound like anyone you know? We are loving this book!  From sourdough breads, kombucha, kimchi, fermented turnips (do you detect a theme here?), dried fruits, candied peel,  ginger beer, preserved lemons,  fruit leathers,  pickled cherry tomatoes (we must try this when we pick our summer harvest – great in a Greek salad)…there is so much more on offer in this hard covered book.

 

What I love is that this is a practical easy to use guide – and with each preserved, pickled, dried or fermented ingredient there are “partner” recipes showing you how to use these ingredients in your cooking- BRILLIANT!

 

Back to the kitchen – time to start experimenting with some new  and different flavours, methods and ingredients.

 

 

 

 

Post Script: Real Food Projects – Kate Walsh

I think this cookbook was written just for me!

Real Food Projects

Real Food Projects

30 Skills. 46 Recipes

Kate Walsh

Murdoch Books

ISBN: 9781743364215

Description:

From churning your own butter and baking no-knead bread to making your own sausages for the barbecue, here are all the skills you need to break up with your supermarket and eat real food!

 

Real Food Projects is your handbook to 30 essential cooking skills that will connect you with your food again. Even if you’re a kitchen rookie, you’ll soon be churning your own butter and slathering it on your own no-knead bread, barbecuing your own homemade sausages or using the season’s freshest fruits to make your own cordials.

 

Step-by-step instructions and photographs guide you from start to finish. For too long we’ve been sold the idea that making our own food is difficult, time-consuming and not worth the effort. But self-taught cook and sustainable food advocate Kate Walsh knows that learning how to cook a few kitchen staples from scratch, using fresh local and seasonal produce, is the best way to improve your health and that of our food system. Better yet, it tastes delicious!

 

Get involved and get stuck into some real food projects today.

 

 

My View:

I think this cookbook was written just for me! There are so many projects listed here that I am already experimenting with in my own kitchen and more I want to try.

 

This is another winner in the real food movement, a book I am proud to have in my kitchen library.

I think the big tick items of this book are as follows:

√ Step by step instructions and photographs are included for all 30 projects.

√ Promotes start from scratch and waste less cooking.

√Promotes the use of fresh local seasonal ingredients.

√ Granolas, butter, cheeses, no knead bread, fruity cordials, sausages, kombucha, kefir, passata, jam, chutneys, yoghurt, nut butter…the list goes on.

√ Helps you rediscover the pleasure of cooking, eating and sharing homemade food.

√ Promotes “number free” cooking – the best way to ensure you know what goes into your food is to make that food yourself.

√ The projects in this book are designed for the home cook and the home kitchen so if you have a wooden spoon and a few bowls, you will be well on your way to making most recipes in this book.

 

Science InThe Kitchen

In previous posts I have reviewed a couple of books on Gut Health- Gut  and Heal You Gut and provided a few Gut Friendly recipes for you to try.  This is what you will find in our kitchen/fridge and pantry these days (might need a bigger or extra fridge soon).  I am loving Kombucha Tea – but must make bigger quantities in future – it a great probiotic drink (recipe can be found in Heal Your Gut by Lee Holmes), my sour dough is well worth the effort of making, the fermented vegetables (husband makes these for us – and currently we are using red and green cabbages from the garden) is great with roasts or sausages, the olives are fermented, the fruit from our trees and taste great and the milk kefir I add to smoothies, husband drinks it by the glassful.

Kombucha Tea

Kombucha Tea – final product – Green tea and  black tea ferments

 

004

L-R Fermented veg – green and red cabbage, sour dough starter, olives, milk kefir

 

Sour Dough

Sour Dough

 

Kombucha starter

Kombucha starter