Marly’s Toasted Macadamia and Banana Pancakes: Ferment – Holly Davis

Ferment cover

Ferment

Holly Davis

Murdoch Books 

ISBN: 9781743368671

 

Images and recipes from Ferment by Holly Davis (Murdoch Books, RRP $45) Photography by Ben Dearnley.

 

marly’s toasted macadamia and banana pancakes 

 

“These pancakes are a variation on a recipe I cook for Marly, for whom I am a private chef. They are fabulous and not difficult to make, though as they contain no grain or dairy products to bind them, they require a slightly different cooking technique than regular pancakes. Try them with a spoonful of cultured apricot spread (p. 154) and a generous drizzle of cashew and citrus amazake cream (p. 44). The toasted nut butter has one ingredient and can be used in any way you might use any other nut butter.”  p54

 

marly's toasted macadamia and banana pancakes

Makes 10–12 pancakes 

Ready in approximately 1 hour 10 minutes 

 

Toasted macadamia nut butter

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) macadamia nuts

 

Macadamia and banana pancakes

4 eggs

120 g (41⁄4 oz/1⁄2 cup) toasted macadamia nut butter
(see above)

2 large or 3 small ripe bananas

125 ml (4 fl oz/1⁄2 cup) water

pinch sea salt

pinch ground cinnamon

1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped

ghee or macadamia oil, for frying

 

Deactivate by toasting Preheat the oven to 120°C (250°F) and place the macadamia nuts on a baking tray. Place in the oven and toast for 20–30 minutes, or until they are an even golden brown. Cool to room temperature then add to a food processor and blitz to a smooth paste. Portion out the amount you’ll need for the pancakes and transfer the remaining nut butter to a spotlessly clean airtight glass jar. This will keep in the fridge for a month or more.

Combine all of the pancake ingredients in a blender or food processor, blitzing well until the mixture increases slightly in volume and becomes lighter.

Preheat the grill (broiler) to medium and set up a wire rack with a clean tea towel (dish towel) draped over it.

Heat a 14 cm (5½ in) round cast-iron frying pan over medium heat. (The pan will be transferred to the grill so use one with an ovenproof handle.) When the pan is hot wipe it with paper towel and a little ghee then lift it off the heat slightly and pour in enough of the pancake batter to cover the pan in an even 3 mm (1⁄8 in) layer, tilting the pan to spread the mixture out evenly. Cook over medium heat until it is golden brown underneath and you can see the edges of the pancake lifting slightly.

Transfer the pan to the grill and cook for about 2 minutes, or until the top is dried but not browned. Return the pan to the stove top and, using a palette knife, carefully flip the pancake over.

Cook for 2 minutes to brown, then transfer the pancake to the cooling rack and cover with another tea towel. Wipe the pan out with paper towel and add a little more ghee, and repeat until the mixture is finished.

Serve the pancakes warm or cold, with a selection of toppings if you like. Once cooked, these pancakes keep well in an airtight container in the fridge for 3–4 days and can be gently reheated in a hot pan.

 

Banoffee Pavlova Roulade: Julie Goodwin’s Essential Cookbook – Julie Goodiwn

 

Julie Goodwin’s Essential Cookbook ($39.99), published by Hachette Australia.

You can sweeten the cream with 1 teaspoon vanilla extract and 1 tablespoon icing sugar if you wish. I choose not to as the pavlova itself is very sweet.
Banoffee Pavlova Roulade
Serves 10–12 Prep time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes
8 eggwhites
2 cups caster sugar
1 tablespoon cornflour
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
600 ml thickened cream, whipped
4 ripe bananas, sliced ½ cm thick
For the caramel sauce
125 g butter
½ cup brown sugar
½ cup thickened cream
For the candied macadamias
½ cup macadamia nut pieces
¼ cup icing sugar
1 Preheat oven to 160°C. Grease and line a 26 x 34 cm baking tray with baking paper.
2 In the bowl of an electric mixer, whip the egg whites until soft peaks form.
Add the sugar a little bit at a time, whipping continually, until the sugar is
dissolved and stiff peaks have formed.
3 Sprinkle over the cornflour, vinegar and vanilla and gently fold through the
egg whites until combined. Do this very gently so as not to knock the air out of
the mixture. Spread the mixture into the baking dish and bake for 20 minutes
or until just firm.
4 When the meringue comes out of the oven, allow to cool for 5 minutes.
Sprinkle a fresh sheet of baking paper with cornflour and lay over the top of
the meringue. Lay a clean tea towel on the bench, and carefully invert the
baking dish so that the meringue comes out on top of the baking paper and
on top of the tea towel. Carefully remove the baking paper from the bottom
of the meringue.
5 Spread half the cream in a line along the long edge of the meringue closest to
you. Press half the sliced bananas into the cream. Now the fun part: carefully,
using the tea towel as a helping hand, roll the meringue over the cream until
it looks like a log. Carefully lift onto the serving plate, putting the join at the
bottom.
6 For the caramel sauce, heat a large frypan over medium heat and melt the
butter and brown sugar together. Add the cream to the pan and bring to the boil, stirring, for 2 minutes or until slightly thickened. Remove from the heat and allow to cool (at room temperature – don’t refrigerate).
7 For the candied macadamias, place the nuts and icing sugar in a fry pan over medium-high heat. Stir until the icing sugar melts and turns golden. Stir to coat evenly and tip the mixture onto a tray lined with baking paper. Allow to cool and bash gently with the base of a glass or a rolling pin to crush just a little.

8 Immediately before serving, spread the remaining cream over the roulade. Spread the remaining banana over the top, drizzle generously with caramel sauce and sprinkle with the macadamias.

Banoffee pavlova roulade p.275

 

 

 

 

Auntie Susan’s Lemon Myrtle Cake: The Natural Cook – Matt Stone

The Natural Cook

 Images and recipes from the Natural Cook by Matt Stone (Murdoch Books)

photography by Matt Roper available from 1st August $39.99

 

Auntie Susan’s Lemon Myrtle Cake

“For as long as I can remember, my Auntie Susan has baked the most amazing cakes. For years I tried to get her to give me a book with all her recipes. Though I’m still waiting for that book, she shares my passion for native foods and has developed this recipe for me. It’s a super simple cake packed with flavour.” (p.30)

 

Ingredients

155 g (5½ oz/1 cup) macadamia nuts

180 g (6½ oz) butter

150 g (5½ oz) sugar

2 eggs, at room temperature

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)

300 g (10½ oz/2 cups) freshly milled flour

185 ml (6 fl oz/¾ cup) buttermilk

2 teaspoons dried lemon myrtle

edible flowers, to decorate (optional)

 

Icing

3 egg whites

210 g (7½ oz) caster (superfine) sugar

210 g (7½ oz) butter

2 teaspoons dried lemon myrtle

Note: Most supermarkets stock lemon myrtle, and it’s a cinch to order online. You can also use lemon myrtle teabags – just remove the leaves from the bag and grind them to a fine consistency. This icing can be used for any cake or muffin. Substitute lemon myrtle with any flavour you like.

Aunty Susans Lemon Myrtle Cake

Method

Preheat the oven to 160˚C (320˚F). Grease a 20 cm (8 in) round cake tin and line the base and side with baking paper.

Spread the macadamia nuts evenly on a baking tray and roast for 12 minutes, or until golden brown, then set aside to cool. Turn the oven up to 170˚C (340˚F).

Using an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter until smooth. Add the sugar and cream the two ingredients for 5 minutes, or until light and fluffy. Add 1 egg at a time, making sure the previous one is incorporated before adding the next. Beat for a further 5 minutes.

In a food processor, blitz the macadamia nuts to form a rough breadcrumb consistency. Add the remaining ingredients, except the edible flowers, and the nuts to the butter mixture and beat until smooth. Pour into the cake tin and bake for 40–45 minutes, or until lightly golden. Gently press on the top of the cake – if it bounces back, it’s ready. Remove from the oven and let it cool for 10 minutes before turning out onto a wire rack to cool further.

To make the icing, fill a medium saucepan one-third full of water and place over medium heat. Bring to a light simmer. Put the egg whites and sugar into a stainless steel bowl. Using a whisk, briefly mix until the sugar has been incorporated. Place the bowl over the simmering water to create a double boiler and, stirring constantly, heat the mixture until the sugar has dissolved.

Using an electric mixer or hand-held electric beaters, whisk the egg mixture at high speed for 10–12 minutes; it will become white, glossy and thick. Keep whisking until the mixture is cool.

Switch to a paddle attachment if you have one, then mix on medium speed, adding the butter in four batches. Beat until thick and creamy, then add the lemon myrtle and stir until combined. Spatula onto the cake with enthusiasm and decorate with edible flowers, if using.