Sunday Roast: Pork Cutlets with Caramelised Pear and Sage

fruit-9781925418446

Edited extract from Fruit by Bernadette Worndl, published by Smith Street Books, $55. Photography © Gunda Dittrich. Out November 2018

 

PORK CUTLETS WITH CARAMELISED PEARS AND SAGE

 “Roast and caramel flavours combine here with smoky wooden-barrel notes of Cognac and creamy, sour crème fraîche.” p. 157

 

4 pork cutlets

salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 bunch sage

2 tablespoons clarified butter

4 small pears

6 French shallots

1 garlic clove

5 juniper berries

5 peppercorns

1 bay leaf

40 ml (1¼ fl oz) Cognac

100 g (3½ oz) crème fraiche

Pork cutlets

 

Preheat the oven to 120°C (250°F) (conventional). Season the cutlets with salt and pepper. Pick the sage leaves. Heat half the clarified butter in a frying pan over high heat. Add the sage leaves and cutlets, and quickly sear the meat on both sides. Transfer the cutlets and sage to an ovenproof dish and cook in the oven for 15 minutes.

Halve or quarters the pears. Peel and halve the shallots, and bruise the garlic clove. Heat the remaining clarified butter in the same pan and cook the pear, shallot and garlic until golden brown. Add the juniper berries, peppercorns, bay leaf and cognac, and very carefully set alight to burn off the alcohol. Stir in the crème fraîche. Remove the cutlets from the oven and transfer them to the sauce. Spoon the sauce over the cutlets for the flavours to combine, then season with salt and pepper and serve.

This goes well with creamy polenta or fresh white bread.

 

 

Spicy Xian Pork Noodles: My Asian Kitchen – Jennifer Joyce

My Asian Kitchen cover art

Images and recipes from My Asian Kitchen by Jennifer Joyce, Murdoch Books, RRP $39.99 Photography by Phil Webb, Illustrations by Riley Joyce

 

This northern Chinese noodle dish is served with a meat sauce that’s not shy on the chilli oil, garlic or Sichuan peppercorns. Traditionally lamb is used, but hand chopping the shoulder meat can be laborious, so I’ve used minced pork. Feel free to use any fat noodles like udon (see page 70) or even pappardelle, which mimic hand-cut noodles. I’ve also included a recipe (see page 214) to make your own. p.212

 

Spicy Xian Pork Noodles

SERVES 4

PREP 10 MINUTES COOK 20 MINUTES

spicy xian pork noodles

 

400 g (14 oz) fresh fat or wide noodles or 250 g (9 oz) dried
1 red chilli, thinly sliced
1 tbsp sesame seeds, toasted

SICHUAN SAUCE
2 tsp cumin seeds
2 tsp coriander seeds
2 tsp Sichuan peppercorns 2 tsp cornflour
4 tbsp roasted chilli flakes in oil, drained, plus 2 tbsp oil
3 cm (1 1/4 inch) ginger, chopped
5 spring onions (scallions)
3 garlic cloves, chopped
400 g (14 oz) minced pork
4 tbsp light soy sauce
5 tbsp black vinegar
2 tbsp Shaoxing rice wine

To make the Sichuan sauce, in a small frying pan toast the spices until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Remove and roughly grind in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder. Set aside.

Dissolve the cornflour in 1 tablespoon water.

Heat a large wok. Add the roasted chilli oil and sauté the ginger, chopped white spring onion parts and the garlic over medium heat until cooked, about 3 minutes. Add the pork and brown for about 4 minutes until crisp, breaking up the pieces. Add the soy, chilli flakes sediment, black vinegar, rice wine, cornflour water and toasted spices. Keep stir-frying until sticky and the sauce is thick. Remove from the heat.

Boil a large pot of water. If using the fresh noodles, boil for
2–3 minutes – they are done when they start to float to the top of the water. Drain and set aside. If using dried, boil for 6–7 minutes and then drain. Give them an extra rinse of hot water to remove any extra starch.

Add the noodles to the sauce and stir-fry over medium heat using two long spoons. When everything is hot and sticky, pour into four large bowls and top with the chopped green parts of the spring onion, sliced red chilli and toasted sesame seeds.

Note

Warning – not all roasted chilli flakes in oil are created equal! Most Asian shops sell various brands of chilli oil or crispy chillies in oil, typically with the flakes, garlic and black beans (basically all the sludge) beneath the oil. My favourite brand is Lao Gan Ma, packaged in a red jar with a photo of a Chinese lady on the front (the name translates to ‘old lady’). It has a cult status around the world and once you’ve tried it, you might find yourself stockpiling extra jars in your cupboard.

 

Honey Mustard Glazed Pork Chops: Julie Goodwin’s Essential Cookbook – Julie Goodwin

Julie Goodwin’s Essential Cookbook ($39.99), published by Hachette Australia.

Honey mustard glazed pork chops
Serves 4 Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes + marinating time

⅓ cup honey
⅓ cup whole grain mustard
⅓ cup white wine
2 cloves garlic, crushed
4 pork loin chops
1 tablespoon olive oil
1/3 cup cream

1 Combine the honey, mustard, wine and garlic in a bowl. Add the pork chops,
ensuring they are coated all over, and marinate for 10 minutes.
2 Heat the oil in a large chef pan over medium-high heat. Remove the chops
from the bowl, reserving the marinade, and cook for about 4–5 minutes on
each side or until golden and just cooked through. Remove from the pan and
rest under foil.
3 Place the reserved marinade in a small saucepan and bring to the boil. Cook
for 2–3 minutes until reduced by half. Stir in the cream and simmer for about
2 minutes or until thickened to a saucy consistency.
4 Drizzle the chops with the honey mustard sauce and serve.

Honey mustard glazed pork chops p.54

My Spaghetti Bolognese: More Please! – Manu Feildel with Clarissa Weerasena

more-please

Images and recipes from More Please! By Manu Feildel with Clarissa Weerasena (Murdoch Books) $39.99

My Spaghetti bolognese

This is probably every kid’s favourite meal and it’s no different for my son Jonti –
he just loooves it. It does take a long time to cook but I think that is the secret to its success: the longer you cook it, the better it will taste. I usually make a big batch and freeze the leftovers for an easy weeknight meal.” p.47

 

my bolognese

 

Serves 4

90 ml (3 fl oz) extra virgin olive oil

250 g (9 oz) minced (ground) beef

250 g (9 oz) minced (ground) pork

150 ml (5 fl oz) white wine

100 g (3½ oz) speck bacon or pancetta, finely diced

1 brown onion, finely chopped

1 carrot, finely diced

1 celery stalk, finely diced

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 x 400 g (14 oz) tin chopped tomatoes

400 ml (14 fl oz) Beef stock (see page 198)

150 ml (5 fl oz) milk

sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

400 g (14 oz) spaghetti or other pasta

grilled bread, to serve (optional)

 

Heat half the olive oil in a large frying pan over medium–high heat. When the oil is hot, add the beef and pork and stir with a wooden spatula; at the same time, press down on the meat to break up any lumps. Keep stirring the meat until it is nicely caramelised, about 3–5 minutes, then pour in the white wine. When it starts to boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer until the wine has almost evaporated.

Meanwhile, place a large frying pan over medium–high heat and pour in the remaining oil. When hot, add the speck or pancetta and fry for 1–2 minutes, then add the onion, carrot and celery and cook for about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute.

Now add the vegetable mixture to the meat and pour in the tomatoes and stock. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and cook, covered, for 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Remove the lid and cook for another hour, or until the liquid has thickened and reduced by one-third.

Stir in the milk, then taste and season if necessary. Simmer for 10–15 minutes (or longer if you have time, as it will only get tastier with long, slow cooking).

Cook the pasta following the packet directions until al dente. Drain and serve with a generous helping of bolognese sauce and some grilled bread, if you like.