Post Script: Watching You – Michael Robotham

THE BEST CRIME /THRILLER READ OF 2013

Watching You (Joseph O'Loughlin, #7)

Michael Robotham

Watching You

Sphere

Little, Brown Book Group

Hatchette UK

ISBN: 9781847445278

Description:

Joe O’Loughlin is back with a pulse-stopping new case.

Marnie Logan often feels like she’s being watched. Nothing she can quite put her finger on — a whisper of breath on the back of her neck, or a shadow in the corner of her eye — and now her life is frozen. Her husband Daniel has been missing for more than a year. Depressed and increasingly desperate, she seeks the help of clinical psychologist Joe O’Loughlin. Joe is concerned by Marnie’s reluctance to talk about the past, but then she discovers a book packed with pictures, interviews with friends, former teachers, old flames and workmates Daniel was preparing for Marnie’s birthday. It was supposed to be a celebration of her life. But it’s not the story anyone was expecting …

 

My View:

Undoubtedly the best crime/thriller read of 2013!

 

I have rediscovered my passion for reading thanks to this book.  Why haven’t I read any of your works before now Michael Robotham? How remiss of me I will certainly seek out your back titles.

 

This novel is a fantastic psychological thriller, it holds your attention in a vice like grip and doesn’t let go! You will be mesmerised by the words on the page, they seem effortless, the story flows and spills like a waterfall, showering you with intrigue and consternation, setting your heart racing. The plot twists and turns and launches your mind in many directions, there is no way you can anticipate the outcome. There is no way you can guess the secrets.

 

It is because of great writers like Michael Robotham that I read crime fiction.

 

I am drunk on the sheer pleasure of reading this book!

Post Script: Close My Eyes – Sophie McKenzie

A brilliant fast paced read!Close My Eyes

Close My Eyes

Sophie McKenzie

Simon & Schuster

ISBN: 9781471111730

Description:

It’s been eight years since Gen Loxley lost her daughter, Beth: eight years of grief in which nothing’s really moved forward, for all that her husband, Art, wills it to. Gen, once a writer of novels, has settled in to a life of half-hearted teaching, while Art makes his name and their fortune – and pressures her into trying IVF once again. For Gen, it seems a cruel act of replacement; life without Beth is unthinkable, unbearable – but still it goes on. And then a woman arrives on Gen’s doorstep, saying the very thing she longs to hear: that her daughter was not stillborn, but was spirited away as a healthy child, and is out there, waiting to be found…So why is Art reluctant to get involved? To save his wife from further hurt? Or something much more sinister? What is the truth about Beth Loxley?

My View:

A stunning read – once I started reading I did not put down till I finished! I had to know what going on, was Gen unstable, trapped in a spiralling web of grief or was there something more sinister and incredible happening? And what was the relevance of the seemingly random addition of the child like voice that punctuated the narrative so disturbingly?

McKenzie writes a great psychological thriller, plenty of twists and turns, a few red herrings thrown in just to keep you guessing, and a topic that is so sensitive and emotive to so many; the death of child and IVF. Add to this a disturbing child like second voice that is somewhat innocent yet menacing at the same time- creepy!

The characters are well developed and Gen is particularly empathetic, she is vulnerable, grieving, and slipping further into depression or is she?  That is a question the reader is forced to ask themselves over and over, every time you think there is a logical reason for an event or a disclosure there is an equal illogical but tantalising option – Gen might not be imagining things, Gen isnt dwelling in a morose place, Gen isnt drawing her own conclusions, making the story fit her own desires, or is she? The see saw ride of doubt is persistent and credible and adds to the dramatic tension; Gen even has doubts herself about her conclusions.

McKenzie keeps the tension high, the pages turn fast.  Towards the end I felt the story line became a little complicated and messy however the sign of a great read is the reader’s ability to suspend their disbelief and go along with the story no matter what– and I was hooked and engaged! The last few pages were brilliant! I did not see that coming.

Thank you to The Reading Room and Simon & Schuster for the opportunity to read and review this great book.