Pumpkin, Potato & Peanut Thai Red Curry: More – Matt Preston

Super easy and delicious – Matt Preston makes cooking wholesome and delicious food easy.

 

More

Matt Preston

Published by Plum

RRP 39.99

Photography by Mark Roper

“Lawd luv a tray bake. Less washing up and loads of crusty burnished bits around the edges to pick at as a cook’s treat.” p202

1 tablespoon melted coconut oil
1 onion, cut into wedges
2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste
70 g (¼ cup) crunchy peanut butter
½ bunch coriander, leaves picked, stalks and roots cleaned and finely chopped
400 ml can coconut cream
2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari
juice of 1 lime and  4 kaffir lime leaves
2 tablespoons coarsely grated palm sugar
1.2 kg butternut pumpkin, peeled, deseeded and cut into 5 cm pieces
3 large coliban potatoes, peeled and quartered lengthways
80 g (½ cup) salted roasted peanuts, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons coconut flakes, toasted
steamed rice, to serve
SERVES 4

 

Preheat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan-forced. Heat the coconut oil in a flameproof roasting tin over medium heat.

Add the onion and cook, stirring, for 2– 3 minutes or until softened. Add the curry paste, peanut butter and coriander stalk and root and cook for 1 minute or until aromatic.

Stir in the coconut cream, soy sauce or tamari, half the lime juice, the kaffir lime leaves and sugar until well combined and bubbling.

Remove the tin from the heat. Add the pumpkin and potato and carefully toss until well coated. Place in the oven and bake for 1 hour or until the vegetables are tender and starting to char around the edges. Squeeze over the remaining lime juice, top with the peanuts, toasted coconut flakes and coriander leaves and serve with steamed rice.

#MeatFreeMonday – Butternut Pumpkin with Lemon Tahini and Miso Granola: Community (New Edition) – Hetty McKinnon

More pumpkin goodness fro you.

Community: New Edition

 Hetty McKinnon

Published by Plum

RRP $39.99,

Photography by Luisa Brimble

 

Sweet butternut pumpkin drizzled with earthy, lemon-scented tahini is a simple salad in itself. Here, I’ve taken this reliable dish to another level with the addition of savoury granola. Miso and chilli sauce bring the umami, and work in tandem with the maple syrup, resulting in a uniquely savoury granola with just a whisper of sweet. This recipe makes a lot of granola – perfect for gifting or keeping in the pantry for snacking and salad topping. It can be stored in an airtight container for several months. You can also vary the nuts and seeds: pumpkin seeds, walnuts, almonds, cashews would all work – just keep the ratios the same.“p205

 

Butternut Pumpkin with Lemon Tahini and Miso Granola

1 large butternut pumpkin (about 1.5 kg), peeled and cut into thick wedges
80–100 ml extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon ground coriander
handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves
sea salt and black pepper

LEMON TAHINI
90 g (1⁄3 cup) tahini
juice of ½ lemon
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, finely chopped
sea salt and black pepper

MISO GRANOLA (MAKES 3 ½ CUPS)
100 g (1 cup) rolled oats
½ cup shelled pistachios, roughly chopped
½ cup hazelnuts, roughly chopped
½ cup sunflower seeds
¼ cup sesame seeds
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons white miso paste
2 teaspoons chilli sauce, such as sriracha, sambal oelek, gochujang (or use dried chilli flakes)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon maple syrup (or brown sugar)

 

Preheat the oven to 220°C.  Place the pumpkin on a baking tray, drizzle with the olive oil and scatter over the paprika, coriander and a generous amount of salt and pepper.
Using your hands, massage the oil and spices into the pumpkin pieces until they are well coated. Spread them in a single layer on the tray, and bake for 30–40 minutes, or until the pumpkin is tender, flipping over halfway through. Insert a knife or skewer to test for doneness.

For the lemon tahini, whisk together the tahini, lemon juice, olive oil and garlic until well combined. Season with salt and pepper.
Whisk in about 125 ml (½ cup) of water, a tablespoon at a time. The sauce will become thick – simply keep adding water and whisking until the mixture is the consistency of thickened cream.

For the miso granola, reduce the oven to 180°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Place all the ingredients in a bowl and toss to combine. Spread the mixture onto the prepared tray and bake for 20 minutes, stirring once, until golden.
Allow to cool completely, then break the granola into smaller pieces using your hands.

To serve, place the pumpkin on a plate and drizzle with the lemon tahini. Top with 3–4 tablespoons of miso granola and finish with the parsley leaves.

Spiced Sweet Potato, Puy Lentils& Rocket with Honey-Roasted Walnuts: Community (New Edition) -Hetty McKinnon

This is a wonderful book for those who love to share their cooking, who love their veggies, for vegans (swap out the honey for maple syrup) and vegetarians too. It is autumn in Western Australia – a time when the garden is producing plenty of sweet potatoes – gold and purple and pumpkins – butternut and kent (and rocket) . I have loved discovering some wonderful recipes that showcase these  ingredients. I hope you love them too.

Community: New Edition

 Hetty McKinnon

Published by Plum

RRP $39.99

Photography by Luisa Brimble

“Sugar and spice and all things nice – this salad is exactly that. The natural sweetness of sweet potato combines perfectly with the warming spices of cumin, cinnamon and nutmeg. And the honey-roasted walnuts are nothing short of show-stopping. Make a double batch and keep them in a jar for snacking!” p83

Spiced Sweet Potato, Puy Lentils& Rocket with Honey-Roasted Walnuts

Serves 4

4 sweet potatoes (about 2 kg), peeled and cut into 2 cm cubes
2–3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 teaspoons ground cumin
½ teaspoon ground allspice
200 g (1 cup) puy lentils, rinsed
1 cup whatever soft herbs you have (such as mint, parsley, chervil, tarragon, chives, dill and/or coriander), finely chopped
2 cups baby rocket leaves
50 g parmesan, shaved
sea salt and black pepper

SWEET VINAIGRETTE

1 tablespoon honey
1 garlic clove, grated
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
80 ml (1⁄3 cup) extra-virgin olive oil
sea salt and black pepper

HONEY-ROASTED WALNUTS

2 tablespoons honey
¼ teaspoon dried chilli flakes
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
pinch of sea salt
2 cups walnuts

 

Preheat the oven to 200°C. On a large baking tray, combine the sweet potato with the olive oil, nutmeg, cinnamon, cumin and allspice and season with salt and pepper. Roast for 25–30 minutes, or until tender and starting to turn golden. Bring a large pot of water to the boil, add the lentils and simmer over medium heat for around 20 minutes, or until the lentils are tender but still have a bite to them. Drain. To make the sweet vinaigrette, whisk together all the ingredients and season with salt and pepper. While the lentils are still warm, stir through the vinaigrette. To prepare the walnuts, combine the honey with the chilli flakes, turmeric, salt and just enough water to make a thick paste. Coat the walnuts in the paste and spread onto a baking tray. Roast for 15 minutes, or until the walnuts are crunchy and almost dry. The nuts will stay a bit sticky, which is fine. Combine half the herbs with the rocket, sweet potato and lentils and season well. To serve, scatter over the walnuts, the remaining herbs and the parmesan.

 

Vegetable and Lentil Tabbouleh:CSIRO Low Carb Diet – Quick and Easy -Grant Brinkworth & Pennie Taylor 

CSIRO Low Carb Diet –  Quick and Easy 

Grant Brinkworth & Pennie Taylor 

Pan Macmillan Australia

RRP $34.99

Vegetable and Lentil Tabbouleh

400 g firm tofu, sliced

4 zucchini, thinly sliced diagonally

640 g fresh vegetable and lentil salad

250 g cherry tomatoes, halved

1 small bunch flat-leaf parsley, stems and leaves finely chopped

¼ cup (60 ml) fat-free Italian dressing

 

Preheat the chargrill plate on a barbecue to medium–high.

Add the tofu and zucchini and cook, turning occasionally, for 5 minutes or until golden and just cooked. Transfer to a large bowl.

Add the remaining ingredients and toss to combine. Season with freshly ground black pepper and serve.

#MeatFreeMonday Summer Vibes Lasagne – Zucchini, Pea and Pumpkin Lasagne: Family Food and Feelings – Kate Berry

Family Food and Feelings

Kate Berry

Pan Macmillan

Plum

ISBN: 978176078-180-4

RRP 39.99

 

This is a fabulous book  – it is a book where you can feel the joy the inspired the food on these pages.

In the next few weeks I will be sharing with you a sample of the goodies these pages hold, starting with Summer Vibes Lasagne.

‘Family, Food and Feelings by Kate Berry, Published by Plum, RRP $39.99, Photography by Kate Berry’ 

“Sometimes I get a little over-enthusiastic at the fruit and veg store, and by the end of the week I’m left with a fridge full of stuff I’m not quite sure what to do with. Pumpkins are the main culprit in our house – I’m always wooed by their reasonable price per kilo. And there’s ALWAYS a sad half-empty bag of peas lurking in the back of the freezer. This is an excellent way to turn those fridge/freezer nuisances into a tasty meal.” p24

200 g (1 1/3 cups) fresh or frozen peas
500 g (2 cups) fresh ricotta, well drained
200 g (2 cups) finely grated parmesan
large handful of basil leaves, roughly torn
finely grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
1 teaspoon dried chilli flakes
salt and pepper
½ butternut pumpkin, seeds removed, halved and peeled
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
8 baby zucchini (a mix of green and yellow is prettiest)
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar

Preheat the oven to 200°C (fan-forced).

Blanch the peas in a saucepan of salted boiling water for 1–2 minutes or until just tender. Drain.

Place the ricotta, parmesan, peas, basil, lemon zest and
chilli flakes in a food processor and blitz to roughly combine.
Season with salt and pepper, then cover and pop in the fridge
until needed.

Using a mandoline (be careful!) or a very sharp knife, thinly
slice the pumpkin into 3–5 mm thick slices.

Combine 1 tablespoon of honey and 1 tablespoon of olive
oil in a bowl.

Place a single layer of pumpkin in the bottom of a 22 cm
square (or similar) baking dish and drizzle with about one third
of the honey mixture. Spread with one-third of the ricotta
mixture. Repeat this process twice more, finishing with a layer
of the ricotta mixture.

Bake for 35 minutes or until the top is golden. Set aside to
cool slightly.

While the lasagne is cooking, thinly slice the zucchini with a mandoline or sharp knife into 3–5 mm thick ribbons. In a small bowl, mix together the vinegar, lemon juice and remaining honey and oil.
Top the lasagne with the zucchini, drizzle with the honey dressing and serve.

#MeatFreeMonday: Coconut Dahl – Lunch at 10 Pomegranate Street – Felicita Sala

Author and Illustrator: Felicita Sala

Publisher: Scribble 

Piccolo Angelo Photography (@piccolo_angelo_photography) 

 

Coconut Dahl

2 cups/400 g red lentils

1 tsp turmeric

2 Tbsp curry powder

3 tbsp coconut oil or ghee

1 litre/4 cups water

1 can of coconut milk

2 carrots

1 clove of garlic minced

1 tbsp grated ginger

3 tbsp tomato paste

2 tbsp salt

4 green onions

 

Finely chop the carrots and green onions.

Gently cook the vegetables in a large pot with the oil/ghee and a pinch of salt. Add the ginger, garlic, turmeric and curry powder. Stir for 1 minute.

Add tomato paste with a little water and stir some more. Add the lentils.  Add the water and simmer for 20 minutes.

Add the coconut milk and salt and simmer for another 15 minutes, stirring occasionally and adding  a little water if needed.

 

Serve with rice.

Serves 6-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

#MondayMunchies: Rumbledethumps – Pinch of Nom – Kate Alinson & Kay Featherstone

Pinch of Nom by Kate Allinson and Kay Featherstone is published by Bluebird, RRP $39.99 and isavailable in all good bookstores.

 

Rumbledethumps

Prep time: 10 mins | Cooking time: 40 mins | 162 KCAL per serving

 

When we asked our fantastic taste testers to review this recipe, the most asked question was, ‘But … what is rumbledethumps?’ Mostly heard of ‘Up North’, it’s a Scottish version of the Irish colcannon, or the English bubble and squeak. Why is it called Rumbledethumps in this book? Because were northerners, of course!p.176

 

Weekly Indulgence

V F GF

Serves 4

 

400g medium potatoes, peeled and diced

200g swede, peeled and diced

Low-calorie cooking spray

½ small onion, thinly sliced

125g green or white cabbage, thinly slices

Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 medium egg yolk

40g reduced-fat cheddar, grated

Cook the diced potato and swede in a pan of boiling salted water until soft, then drain and set aside.

 

Preheat the oven to 200°C (fan 180°C/gas mark 6).

 

Spray a large frying pan with some low-calorie cooking spray and place over a medium heat. Add the onion and cabbage and cook for 3–4 minutes until they start to soften slightly, then add them to the cooked potato and swede and mash roughly with a fork or spoon. You want to leave it a bit chunky.

 

Season well with salt and pepper and stir in the egg yolk. Place in an overproof dish, sprinkle the grated cheese evenly over the top, and cook in the oven for 15–20 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and golden brown.

 

Remove from the oven and serve.

 

 

#MeatFreeMonday: Samosas – A Pinch of Nom – Kate Allinson & Kay Feathestone

When I first picked up this book and started flicking through the recipes to see what might catch my eye, I failed to notice “100 slimming home style recipes” noted on the front cover. The fact that these are calorie reduced meals did not detract me from exploring this book; the types of meals here are things I might make everyday – healthy home cooking choices. What a great book! I hope you find some, new favourites here too.

Pinch of Nom by Kate Allinson and Kay Featherstone is published by Bluebird, RRP $39.99 and is available in all good bookstores.

 

Samosas

Prep time: 10 mins | Cooking time: 15 mins | 151 KCAL per serving

 

Yes, you read correctly: samosas! Making a simple swap from pastry to tortilla wrap instantly brings down the calories. Filled with fresh ingredient, you’ll be reaching for these time and time again for fakeaway nights (served with our Super Simple Chicken Curry on page 58), or just as a snack.” p. 224

V F GF (use GF wraps)

Makes 6

 

2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 cm (½ in) dice

75g frozen peas

Low-calorie cooking spray

½ onion, diced

1 garlic clove, crushed

1 tsp grated root ginger

Generous pinch of chilli powder

½ tsp ground coriander

¼ tsp ground cumin

¼ tsp ground turmeric

½ tsp garam masala

30g spinach

Juice of ½ lemon

Sea salt

3 low-calorie tortilla wraps, cut in half

1 egg, beaten

Fresh coriander, to serve (optional)

Cook the diced potatoes in a pan of boiling salted water for 5 minutes, then drain. Cook the peas in boiling salted water and drain.

 

Preheat the oven to 200°C (fan 180°C/gas mark 6) and line a baking tray with some greaseproof paper or baking parchment.

 

Spray a pan with some low-calorie cooking spray and place over a medium heat. Add the onion, garlic and ginger and cook for 3 – 4 minutes until softened but not browned, then add the spices and cook for another minute. Stir in the cooked potato and mash it slightly with a fork or the back of a spoon before adding the uncooked spinach, lemon juice and peas. Add a pinch of salt and stir.

 

Brush the edges of the halved wraps with the beaten egg. Fold each half into a cone shape and seal the edge, leaving the top open to add the filling.

 

Divide the filling equally between the wraps, being careful not to over-fill them. If you do, you will not be able to seal them properly.

 

Brush the open end of the wraps with some more beaten egg, leave for 30–40 seconds, until it becomes tacky, then press the edges together firmly. You can use a fork to do this, but be careful not to rip the wrap. Arrange the samosas on the tray.

 

Brush each samosa with plenty of beaten egg, make sure the edges are sealed, then place in the oven for 10 minutes, or until they are golden brown.

 

Remove from the oven and serve warm. You can also allow to cool, wrap in baking parchment and freeze for another day.

 

Pretzels: Love Laugh Bake! Silvia Colloca

Love Laugh Bake

Love, Laugh, Bake! By Silvia Colloca, Published by Plum, RRP $39.00, Photography by Rob Palmer 

 

THE BREAD BASKET
PRETZELS
“If you have travelled around those magnificent lands in the north of Italy, right on the border with Switzerland
and Austria, you may have wondered if all of a sudden you had crossed the frontier! Fair enough too, as
the first language spoken up there is German, and the culinary traditions of the area borrow more from the
neighbouring countries than the rest of Italy. This is where local restaurants offer wonderfully rich cabbage and
pork stews, spaetzle soup, apple strudel and the much-loved pretzel to accompany pints of Weissbier.
The traditional recipe for pretzels is a tricky one. It’s not complicated but in order to achieve the unique chewy
crumb and bronzed caramelised crust you need one crucial ingredient: the very caustic and abrasive lye. It is
true that you only need it at 3% of its strength, but after reading that I would need to protect myself with
thick gloves and safety goggles and (knowing how accident prone I am) I had to come up with an alternative.
Using bicarbonate of soda may make some purists cringe, but I am very happy to say the pretzels taste divine
and my hands and eyes are burn free! ” (p.52)

PRE-FERMENT
375 ml (1½ cups) lukewarm water
2 teaspoons dried yeast
225 g (1½ cups) 00 or plain flour
1 tablespoon barley malt syrup

DOUGH
375 g (2½ cups) 00 or plain flour
40 g unsalted butter, softened
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon bicarbonate of soda
2 tablespoons barley malt syrup
salt flakes, poppy seeds or sesame
seeds, to coat

To make the pre-ferment, mix all the ingredients together in a large bowl to
form a wet dough. Let it stand for 2 hours or until it looks very bubbly and has
doubled in size.

Add the flour, butter and salt to the risen ferment and knead for 6–8 minutes
or until smooth. Use a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook if you have one
handy. Cover the bowl with a damp tea towel and prove at room temperature
for 1½ hours or until more than doubled in size.

Line a large baking tray with baking paper. Gently scrape the dough out of the
bowl onto a floured surface and form into an oval shape. Cut it evenly into
eight pieces and roll each piece into a long thin rope. Twist the rope around to
form a pretzel shape and gently press the ends into place.
Place the pretzels on the prepared tray, leaving plenty of room for spreading.
Cover with a damp tea towel and rest at room temperature for 20 minutes.
The pretzels will grow by about one-third during this time.

Preheat your oven to 200°C.

Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil and add the bicarbonate of soda
and barley malt syrup. Working with a few pretzels at a time, drop them into
the simmering water for 1 minute on each side, then lift them out gently with
a slotted spoon back onto the tray. Sprinkle liberally with salt, poppy seeds or
sesame seeds and bake for 12–15 minutes or until golden. Remove and cool
on a wire rack for 30 minutes before eating.

MAKES 8

 

                  

Meat Free Monday: Vegetarian Pho – Fodmap Friendly – Georgia McDermott

FODMAP Friendly Cover

FODMAP Friendly by Georgia McDermott, Published by Macmillan Australia, RRP $34.99

“Vietnam is one of my all-time favourite travel destinations, and at least 70% of that assessment is a direct result of
the national dish, pho. While pho is traditionally made with a beef broth heavy in onion and garlic, I’ve created
an inadvertently vegan and advertently FODMAP-friendly version. Shiitake mushrooms add a necessary depth to the
broth, but you can adjust the amount if they are a trigger for you.” p.66

 

Vegetarian pho

Vegetarian pho
Serves 4
Pho broth
4 cinnamon quills
7 star anise
2 cloves
1 tablespoon peanut or
sesame oil
2 large carrots, roughly
chopped
1 large fennel, roughly chopped
(you can throw the fronds
in too)
10 g fresh ginger, peeled and
finely sliced
75 g fresh shiitake mushrooms,
sliced
4 tablespoons gluten-free tamari
2.5 litres water
a bunch of Thai basil, leaves picked, stems discarded
a bunch of Vietnamese mint, leaves picked, stems discarded

to serve
200 g firm tofu
1 large carrot, julienned
a bunch of bok choy
250 g rice noodles
fresh red chilli, finely sliced
lime wedges

 

1. Place a large saucepan over a medium heat, and dry-fry the cinnamon, star anise and cloves for a minute or two, or until fragrant. Add the peanut oil, chopped carrot and fennel and cook for a couple of minutes until it begins to sizzle. Add the ginger, shiitake and a splash of water, and continue to cook for another couple of minutes.
2. Add the tamari, and once it has reduced down and caramelised on the bottom of the pan, add the water. Place the lid on the pan and bring the broth to the boil. Add a handful of the herbs, reduce to a medium heat and cook for 20 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, in a medium frying pan over a medium heat, dry-fry the tofu, cubed or in slabs, and then pour over
a splash of tamari. Remove the pan from the heat.
4. Transfer the tofu to a plate, then rinse out the frying pan and return it to the heat. Gently cook the carrots and bok
choy with a splash of water until done. Remove from the heat.
5. Prepare the rice noodles as per the packet instructions.
6. To assemble, divide the noodles between four serving bowls and then arrange the tofu, carrot and bok choy on top. Ladle over the pho broth, and finish the bowls with some fresh chilli, herbs and wedges of lime.